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Naples gets funding for migrants — but is it enough?

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Naples gets funding for migrants — but is it enough?

Naples gets funding for migrants — but is it enough?
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While the rest of Italy is enduring its last two weeks of electoral campaign, Interior Minister Marco Minniti is in Castel Volturno, near Naples.

Many in the area feel abandoned by the State. The migrant population here is large.

Italy's government could change colour, after the March 4th legislative elections.

Nevertheless, Minniti signed a protocol, putting on the table an investment worth €21 million to be spent in security and integration politics.

The local mayor is not sure it is enough.

"Repression and controlling the territory is not enough, even if the Minister just promised us more police: here we don't have anymore the Camorra or Neapolitanean mafia to deal with , but more a micro-criminality, predatory acts committed by people who have no place at our table, namely migrants," Dimitri Russo told Euronews

Organized crime is mainly based in the outskirts, some effects are often felt also in Naples city centre, where life continues with an apparent normality.

Even residents of african origins who grew up here think the current levels of migration are no longer acceptable:

"We live in an abandoned place, we cannot accept all this persons, because we don't have the strength nor the means to educate them. We are not in Africa but in a civilized country, and these people have to be educated" local citizen Martin, of African origin, told Euronews.

Migration and security are key issues in Italy's electoral campaign, highlighted by the recent attack in Macerata.

Close to 30,000 inhabitants: 20,000 are migrants, 15,000 are illegal.

The protocol signed by the interior minister wants to bring a change for this challenged and struggling region.