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The Brief: Opposition parties launch rival plans to avoid no-deal Brexit

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The Brief: Opposition parties launch rival plans to avoid no-deal Brexit
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With the clock ticking down to a no-deal Brexit, opposition parties have been launching rival plans to avoid a cliff-edge departure.

The leader of Britain's main opposition, the Labour Party, has called for the MPs to unite against Prime Minister Boris Johnson.

Jeremy Corbyn says "he's taking us away from Europe into the arms of Donald Trump by his obsession with a no-deal Brexit".

Corbyn plans to call a no-confidence vote in Johnson's government. If he wins, the Labour leader would form a "temporary government" to delay Brexit by calling a national election. And if that succeeds, he would hold a second referendum on remaining in the European Union.

But his plans were met with mixed responses, for example from Scottish National Party leader Nicola Sturgeon.

"It's no secret I'm not a great fan of Jeremy Corbyn but we won't rule out any option if it helps to avert what is a looming catastrophe of a no-deal Brexit," she said.

Corbyn needs the help of the Liberal Democrats to succeed, but he cannot count on it.

Jo Swinson, the party's new leader, does not think he is the right man for the job.

"We are facing a national crisis," she said. "We may need an emergency government to resolve it. But if Jeremy Corbyn truly wants that to succeed, surely even he can see that he cannot lead it."

Swinson's own plan to lead a national unity government is unlikely to win support. Meaning the prospect of no-deal exit on October 31 looms large.

Read more:

Labour's Corbyn proposes plan to replace Johnson and block no-deal Brexit

No-deal Brexit: everything you need to know

Brexit Guide: where are we now?