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Spain: Mariano Rajoy tells the King he will not form a government

Spain: Mariano Rajoy tells the King he will not form a government
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By Euronews with REUTERS
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The incumbent Prime Minister plays a high-stakes game of "wait and see"

  • Spain’s political drama continues
  • Focus now switches to centre-left
  • A tense few days ahead

The news

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Spain’s incumbent Conservative Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy has turned down an offer by King Felipe VI to form a new government following last month’s inconclusive elections.

Spain's Rajoy forces new round of talks to counter left-wing alliance https://t.co/R8prIS2Hdi via Reuters</a></p>&mdash; Julien Toyer (JulienToyer) January 22, 2016

The unexpected announcement came shortly after Mr Rajoy met the Spanish monarch at the end of a week of talks with party leaders trying to nominate a candidate.

Fresh talks will now get underway next week.

Earlier in the day, the Socialists and anti-austerity party Podemos said they would seek a deal to form a left-wing coalition.

The context

Rajoy’s popular party won 123 seats in the election in December.

However, they failed to clinch a majority in the 350-seat lower house of parliament.

The Socialists came second in the election with 90. They are thought to have more chances of mustering support from other groups in Parliament in forming a coalition.

RAJOY: Says has not spoken with Pedro Sánchez, who refused to speak to him. https://t.co/CtpZCZQYRbpic.twitter.com/JigpVXXQHR

— The Spain Report (@thespainreport) January 22, 2016

Mr Rajoy said he would try to win a majority.

But most parties have said they would reject a second administration under his leadership.

What happens now?

El PSOE</a> va a cumplir con el mandato expresado en las urnas, el del cambio para un Gobierno progresista en España. <a href="https://t.co/BzKPqlXYYh">pic.twitter.com/BzKPqlXYYh</a></p>&mdash; Pedro Sánchez (sanchezcastejon) January 18, 2016

The king is likely to ask the opposition Socialist party leader Pedro Sanchez to try and form a government.

Mr Sanchez says he is trying to form a “progressive” government with Podemos and other groups on the left.

Los mejores memes tras la propuesta de Pablo Iglesias a Pedro Sánchez [GALERÍA] https://t.co/mKFzr6Cdiupic.twitter.com/L8tr4xswth

— Antena3Noticias (@A3Noticias) January 22, 2016

The grouping would have a combined 161 seat.

That would still leave them short of a majority, meaning they will need backing from regional parties from the Basque Country and Catalonia to form a stable administration.

The nominated candidate must win a vote of confidence in the parliament.

If no party leader manages to win the support of Parliament within two months of the first vote, fresh national elections must be called.

What they are saying

#Spain | Rajoy declines to seek confidence of parliament https://t.co/Ents5lRoIQ
Rajoy is smart enough to not go through a humiliation.

— Yannis Koutsomitis (@YanniKouts) January 22, 2016

Huge news in Spain: PM Rajoy concedes, citing Podemos offer to PSOE. Left-regionalist coalition now possible, but all depends on Catalonia.

— Jeremy Cliffe (@JeremyCliffe) January 22, 2016

PSOE is very annoyed with Rajoy's decison to decline the King's offer to form a govt., labels it “irresponsible”. pic.twitter.com/1LboxrzBFy

— The Spain Report (@thespainreport) January 22, 2016

PEDRO SÁNCHEZ: “I entered Zarzuela without a government and came out with ministers” https://t.co/2ZXYquXyYZ

— The Spain Report (@thespainreport) January 22, 2016

With Spain in political deadlock the prospect of more elections is a dangerous one for Pedro Sánchez’s Socialists | https://t.co/BfusAnDvnd

— Policy Network (@policynetwork) January 22, 2016

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