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Spain's Socialists and hard-left Sumar party reach coalition agreement

Spain's acting Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez (L) and the founder of Sumar, Yolanda Diaz, applaud after signing an agreement to form a coalition government.
Spain's acting Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez (L) and the founder of Sumar, Yolanda Diaz, applaud after signing an agreement to form a coalition government. Copyright OSCAR DEL POZO/AFP or licensors
Copyright OSCAR DEL POZO/AFP or licensors
By Euronews with agencies
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The deal reached between Spain's Socialists and hard-left Sumar parties is not enough to guarantee outgoing prime minister, Pedro Sánchez, another term in office.

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Spain’s Socialist Party (PSOE), led by outgoing Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez, and Yolanda Díaz’s far-left Sumar party on Tuesday signed an agreement to form a coalition government.

The deal includes a range of social measures such as a commitment to reduce working hours without lowering salaries, increasing the minimum wage, and boosting public housing.

In a joint statement, the two parties said the deal would cover the four-year legislative term and allow the country to continue growing in a sustainable manner, with policies based on social and climate justice.

But the potential coalition is not enough to guarantee Sánchez another term as prime minister, as it still needs to win the backing of other parties in parliament.

In addition to Sumar’s 33 lower-house lawmakers, the PSOE also needs the support of other smaller regional parties, including those that advocate for Catalan and Basque independence.

The hardest task facing Sánchez will be winning the support of the Catalan separatist Junts group and the Republican Left of Catalonia.

Both are both demanding a blanket amnesty for those implicated in the failed 2017 Catalan independence referendum, as well as consent to hold a new vote on self-determination.

Sánchez has until 27 November to secure the backing of a majority of lawmakers, or new elections will be held in January 2024.

Spain has been in political limbo since a July snap election that saw the conservative Popular Party finish first, but without enough votes to form a government.

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