Homeless charity in Ireland targeted with abuse after helping refugees

Abuse was shouted at volunteers as they tried to help the refugees move.
Abuse was shouted at volunteers as they tried to help the refugees move. Copyright Streetlink Homeless Support
By Scott Reid
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Charity volunteers threatened after trying to help refugees whose camp was burned down by anti-immigration protesters

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A homeless charity which had been helping refugees in the Irish capital, before protesters burned down an encampment, has been targeted with abusive phone calls. 

As Euronews previously reported, a makeshift migrant camp on Sandwith Street in Dublin was burned down last Friday after a demonstration. 

The incident was followed by days of anti-immigration protests in the city. 

The charity, Streetlink Homeless Support, has since received abusive calls from protesters.

Speaking to Euronews, Pádraig Drummond, the organisation's CEO, said: "There were missed calls on Saturday morning, and then I got a call and got all this 'f-ing f-ing' carry on. He just kept spamming. I tried to point out he was spamming a community outreach number."

Drummond said the charity had been subject to abuse and threats the previous night as well as they tried to help those in the camp. The charity had been trying to move refugees and their tents to a safer location due to threats that had been received. 

Streetlink's Facebook page outlined the issues: "Our outreach vehicle was blocked from leaving the area with the belongings of the homeless; while it was blocked from leaving, our volunteers were verbally abused, the vehicle doors kicked, and missiles struck the vehicle."

Mr Drummond called on authorities to consult with communities ahead of people being moved into areas.

He said: "The situation is there’s no communication with community representatives before they open up somewhere for these people beforehand.

"You then get right-wing agitators accusing them of being paedophiles, murderers, all that stuff and these are people fleeing war to come here and get this, and the agitators are getting the youth riled up.

"They need to engage with the community so they can discuss with their neighbours what’s going on."

On their Facebook page, the charity said their outreach service has now reopened and added: "Our team spent the weekend advocating for those displaced by the racist attacks at the homeless encampments. All those accommodated so far have been linked to the relevant services. Over the coming weeks, all will receive alternative accommodation from the State.

"We commend all those who went above and beyond to protect those who were attacked and continue to provide for their needs."

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