Swedish lawmakers vote to endorse NATO accession

Sweden's Prime Minister Ulf Kristersson, left, and Oscar Stenstroem, chief negotiator in the NATO process, hold a press briefing on the NATO process on Tuesday, March 14; 2023
Sweden's Prime Minister Ulf Kristersson, left, and Oscar Stenstroem, chief negotiator in the NATO process, hold a press briefing on the NATO process on Tuesday, March 14; 2023 Copyright AP Photo
By Euronews with AP
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Swedish parliament voted in favour of NATO accession.

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Lawmakers in Sweden voted overwhelmingly in favour of the Nordic nation joining NATO, signing off on the country's membership along with the required legislation.

The 349-seat Riksdagen, or parliament, authorised Sweden’s accession to NATO on a 269-37 vote, with 43 absent. It was the last required domestic hurdle to the country becoming part of the 30-member Western military alliance.

Screenshot of voting results over the proposition to join NATO.

Six of the eight parties represented in parliament were in favour of NATO membership, and the vote that followed a nearly seven-hour debate was seen as a formality.

“Membership in NATO is the best way to safeguard Sweden’s security,” Foreign Minister Tobias Billström said during the deliberations. He called it “a historical event” and “one of the most important security policy decisions ever for our country.”

Another important vote took place in the parliament this afternoon, shortly following the NATO adhesion. The Swedish parliament also voted against a proposal to forbid nuclear weapons on Swedish territory.

Admitting new members need unanimous approval from existing members

Two NATO countries, Turkey and Hungary, have yet to ratify the Nordic nations' joint application. 

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said last week that his government would move forward with ratifying Finland, paving the way for the country to join the alliance before Sweden. 

Erdogan said Sweden still must resolve the Turkish concerns that had delayed action on the joint application.The Turkish government accused both Sweden and Finland of being too soft on groups that it deems to be terror organisations but expressed more reservations about Sweden. 

The government in Ankara cited demonstrations on the streets of Stockholm by supporters of Kurdish militants.

A series of separate demonstrations in Stockholm, including a protest by an anti-Islam activist who burned the Quran outside the Turkish Embassy, also angered Turkish officials.

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