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Thailand cave boys write letters to their families: 'I love you' as rescue operations continue

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Thailand cave boys write letters to their families: 'I love you' as rescue operations continue

A handwritten note written by a diver during a rescue misssion in Thailand
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Thai Navy Seal/via REUTERS
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Boys trapped in a Thai cave wrote letters to their parents on Friday, telling them to “be strong” and not to worry.

The letters represent the first communication from the children since becoming trapped on June 23. Letters from their parents had earlier been brought in by foreign divers.

"I love you, Dad, Mum and my sister. You don't need to be worried about me. I love everyone!"

“Don’t worry, be strong,” one boy wrote in his letter, adding that he wants “to eat a lot of food” and “go home” once he comes out.

“Teachers, don’t give us lots of homework!” read another.

Ekkapol Chantawong, the boys’ 25-year-old football coach, apologised to the parents in his own letter.

“Dear all kids' parents, now all of them are fine, the rescue team is treating us well.

"And I promise I will take care of the kids as best as I can. Thank you for everyone's that come to help.

Reuters
A handwritten message written by a diver during the rescue mission reads, 'The children said don't worry about them. They are all strong. They said they want to eat many things. They want to go home immediately once they get out. Teachers, please don't give too much homework'Reuters

“Dear all kids' parents, now all of them are fine, the rescue team is treating us well.

"And I promise I will take care of the kids as best as I can. Thank you for everyone's that come to help.

The twelve boys and their coach got caught by flood waters while visiting the Tham Luang cave in the north of the country in late June, launching an international rescue effort.

They were found 10 days later (July 2) by British rescue divers and have since been receiving supplies of food and oxygen.

But the difficulty of getting them out was emphasised on Friday when Saman Kunan, a 38-year-old former Thai Navy Seal died after laying oxygen tanks along a potential exit route.