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Raw Politics in full: Backstop, EU negotiations, and worries in Ireland

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Raw Politics in full: Backstop, EU negotiations, and worries in Ireland
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Brexit backtrack

Following last night's vote in the House of Commons, Prime Minister Theresa May has been given two weeks to draw up a new plan for the Irish backstop. If May is able to make the necessary changes, the edited deal will be voted on February 13.

However, even if the new deal is changed by a majority of 317 to 301, there is still no solid alternative plan for the backstop deal.

May also faced backlash from the EU, who have made it clear that they are unwilling to make changes.

Watch: 'Withdrawal agreement remains best and only deal possible,' says Juncker

Mission impossible

Although MPs passed an amendment, which promises to replace the existing Irish backstop, the UK vote did not gather a positive reaction from the EU.

Just after news broke of the result of the vote, a spokesperson for EU council president Donald Tusk, said the EU wasn't willing to reopen the deal.

Old wounds

In light of the possibility of a no deal Brexit, Ireland's future still remains a burning question.

Euronews speaks with Deirdre Hargey who believes that people are right to be concerned about what could be next for a border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.