This content is not available in your region

Cypriot leaders agree to push for peace

Access to the comments Comments
By Euronews
Cypriot leaders agree to push for peace

<p>.<br /> The leaders of ethnically divided Cyprus have agreed to restart peace talks on May 15 under the auspices of the United Nations. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="en data-scribe-reduced-action-queue="><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Cyprus rivals to resume peace talks on Friday: UN <a href="http://t.co/gFwaQEgKPx">http://t.co/gFwaQEgKPx</a></p>— Agence France-Presse (@AFP) <a href="https://twitter.com/AFP/status/597851046862573570">May 11, 2015</a></blockquote> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script> <p>It was the first time the two had met since moderate leftist Mustafa Akinci swept to victory in April’s Turkish Cypriot leadership election.</p> <p>Greek Cypriot leader Nicos Anastasiades said the time was right to use the momentum to move forward.</p> <p>Cyprus has been divided since the Turkish army invaded in 1974 in response to a brief Greek-inspired coup aimed at union with Greece.</p> <p>Finding a settlement has defied generations of diplomats but on his election win Akinci said a peace deal was his priority.</p> <p>Both sides agree the island should be united under a two-state federal umbrella but past negotiations have faltered on the powers of a central government and property rights of thousands of internally displaced people.</p> The last major peace push collapsed in 2004, when Greek Cypriots rejected a reunification blueprint accepted by Turkish Cypriots. <p>Northern Cyprus is financially and militarily supported by Turkey, the only country which recognises it as a separate state. The Greek Cypriot government, which in practice controls only the south, represents the whole island in the European Union.</p>