"A la vôtre!"

"A la vôtre!"

As every year in France, bottles are opened for the Beaujolais Nouveau. This tradition began after a Government Order issued on September the 15th, 1951. Originally the aim was to produce a wine that can be quickly released on the market. The Beaujolais Nouveau is qualified as a “primeur” wine, which means it is sold very soon after its harvest. The wine macerates for only two months. Beaujolais Nouveau is now well-known around the world. Japan is the leading importer of this wine, buying 59.183 hectolitres (7.9 million bottles).

As every year in France, bottles are opened for the Beaujolais Nouveau.
This tradition began after a Government Order issued on September the 15th, 1951. Originally the aim was to produce a wine that can be quickly released on the market. The Beaujolais Nouveau is qualified as a “primeur” wine, which means it is sold very soon after its harvest. The wine macerates for only two months.
Beaujolais Nouveau is now well-known around the world. Japan is the leading importer of this wine, buying 59.183 hectolitres (7.9 million bottles).