Filmmaker Ken Loach talks about realistic filmmaking in Lyon

British filmmaker Ken Loach speaks to Euronews about his socially-oriented cinema.
British filmmaker Ken Loach speaks to Euronews about his socially-oriented cinema.
By Frédéric PonsardMaxime Biosse Duplan, Lauren Chadwick
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Filmmaker Ken Loach was in Lyon for the Lumière Film Festival where he spoke to Euronews about his socially aware and realistic cinema.

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Ken Loach’s new film is, as usual, anchored in reality.

Sorry We Missed You depicts a tough and gruelling reality in Newcastle that shows the “Uberisation” of work and an impoverished working class.

The film will hit European cinemas this fall.

At 83 years old, Ken Loach is a regular at film festivals and award ceremonies. He won two Palmes d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival in 2006 and 2016.

His winning film in 2016, I, Daniel Blake, depicted people in poverty navigating the British welfare system.

The filmmaker was in Lyon recently for the Lumière Film Festival where he gave a masterclass on socially-oriented cinema.

He spoke to Euronews about his films and the current state of politics.

"Commercial cinema is about something else but there’s a good tradition of cinema which is about reflecting the life we know… You have to be optimistic, I mean people by and large have good instincts. You know they want to live well, they want to live in dignity they don’t want to live in inequality. People are always encouraging," Loach said.

Loach even commented on Brexit, explaining his view that UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson's agreement with the EU will not be in the interest of ordinary people.

"We do know that if Boris Johnson makes the agreement it will not be in the interest of ordinary people. It will be in the interest of big business and so it won’t be what the people need, which is security of work, decent wages, good public services," Loach said. "It won’t be that. It’ll be an agreement that supports big business."

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