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New Zealand legalises assisted dying for the terminally ill

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By Euronews
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In this Oct. 16, 2020, file photo, cars are driven past a billboard urging voters to vote "No" against euthanasia in Christchurch, New Zealand.
In this Oct. 16, 2020, file photo, cars are driven past a billboard urging voters to vote "No" against euthanasia in Christchurch, New Zealand.   -   Copyright  Mark Baker / AP

New legislation supporting assisted dying has come into force in New Zealand, more than a year after almost two-thirds of New Zealanders voted in favour of the law in a referendum.

The End of Life Choice Act will allow terminally ill patients to request doctors to end their lives.

To be eligible, a person must have a terminal illness that is likely to end their life within six months or is in an "advanced state of irreversible decline". They must also be able to make an informed decision.

Supporters believe the law will give New Zealanders who are "suffering terribly at the end of their lives" choice, compassion, and dignity.

New Zealand's government has appointed three experts, including a medical ethicist, to monitor the legislation.

Watch the video report in the player, above.