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UK stops accepting ID cards for European arrivals in post-Brexit overhaul

FILE: Travellers walk past Eurostar trains linking Paris to London, at the Gare du Nord station Thursday, March 21, 2019 in Paris.
FILE: Travellers walk past Eurostar trains linking Paris to London, at the Gare du Nord station Thursday, March 21, 2019 in Paris. Copyright Francois Mori/AP
Copyright Francois Mori/AP
By Euronews
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European citizens now need a valid passport to enter the UK as post-Brexit rules enter into force on Friday.

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As new post-Brexit rules enter into force on Friday, European Union citizens cannot use their national identity (ID) cards to enter the UK anymore. A valid passport is now required, the Home Office said in a statement.

"By ending the use of insecure ID cards we are strengthening our border and delivering on the people’s priority to take back control of our immigration system," said Home Secretary Priti Patel.

EEA and Swiss citizens are also subjected to the new rules, which were first announced in October last year.

The change "will prevent organised crime gangs and others who seek to abuse the system," the Home Office said, noting that "ID cards are some of the most abused documents seen by Border Force officers."

British authorities say ID cards are easier to falsify because they do not include biometric data.

"Last year, almost half of all false documents detected at the border were EU, EEA or Swiss ID cards," the Home Office said.

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