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In photos: Suffering from cancer amid war in Yemen

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In photos: Suffering from cancer amid war in Yemen

In photos: Suffering from cancer amid war in Yemen
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REUTERS
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Aside from a three-year-long civil war, thousands of Yemenis are also dealing with another problem: poor healthcare.

As battles rage between regime forces and Houthi rebels, supported by Saudi-led coalition forces and Iran-backed fighters respectively, hospitals in the Arab country are struggling to accommodate cancer patients.

Khaled Abdullah/REUTERS
A little girl with cancer rests at The National Oncology CentreKhaled Abdullah/REUTERS

Khaled Abdullah/REUTERS
A boy sits on a chair as he receives cancer treatment at The National Oncology CentreKhaled Abdullah/REUTERS

The National Oncology Centre in Sanaa admits 600 new cases each month, but beds are limited. The few available are reserved for children, meaning many are forced to receive treatment from a chair or in the waiting area.

Khaled Abdullah/REUTERS
Women receive cancer treatment at The National Oncology CentreKhaled Abdullah/REUTERS

Khaled Abdullah/REUTERS
Mohammed Al-Emad, a relative of a cancer patient, says medicine supplies are sparse, and where they are available, patients can rarely afford them.Khaled Abdullah/REUTERS

But despite growing demand for its services, the centre received just $1 million funding last year from state entities and international aid groups.

And treatment for patients is unaffordable for many.

Khaled Abdullah/REUTERS
A cancer patient lies in the radiation therapy room at the National Oncology CentreKhaled Abdullah/REUTERS

Khaled Abdullah/REUTERS
Mohammed al-Hosami sits next to his mother who has cancer on a bed at a cancer treatment center in Hodeidah, YemenKhaled Abdullah/REUTERS

"I spent all our valuables and had to borrow a lot of money to cover the expenses of my daughter's treatment," Khaled Ismael says of his 17-year-old daughter, Radhiya, who had her left arm amputated due to cancer. "In the end, we couldn't afford a good treatment."

"Because of our inability to travel abroad, my daughter did not get enough treatment and her arm had to be amputated," he added. "The war has devastated our lives."

Khaled Abdullah/REUTERS
Khaled Ismael kisses the hand of his daughter, Radhiya, 17, who had her left arm amputated due to cancer, at their house in Amran, Yemen.Khaled Abdullah/REUTERS

Khaled Abdullah/REUTERS
Children with cancer play as they receive chemotherapy at The National Oncology Centre.Khaled Abdullah/REUTERS

Reuters photographer Khaled Abdullah visited the oncology area of several Yemeni hospitals to show their plight, and photographed cancer sufferers staying in charity houses or living with their illness at home.

Khaled Abdullah/REUTERS
Ahmed al-Hawsalah, 18, who has nose cancer, lies on a bed as his father sits near him at a charity which houses cancer patients in Sanaa, Yemen.Khaled Abdullah/REUTERS

Khaled Abdullah/REUTERS
A boy with cancer is helped by his father at The National Oncology CentreKhaled Abdullah/REUTERS

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that there are around 35,000 people suffering with cancer in Yemen, with 11,000 new diagnoses made each year.

Khaled Abdullah/REUTERS
Ali Hizam Mused, 70, who has mouth cancer, lies on a bed at a charity which houses cancer patientsKhaled Abdullah/REUTERS

Khaled Abdullah/REUTERS
A boy who has cancer lies on a bed at The National Oncology CentreKhaled Abdullah/REUTERS

Meanwhile, the civil war has resulted in the deaths of more than 6,500 civilians.