Public health officials are concerned about a surge in the condition linked to Zika and fear the virus could spread across Latin\u00a0America\u00a0and\u00a0the\u00a0Caribbean.

Brazil is in a new stage of the Zika crisis: Caring for infants with tragic birth defects. https://t.co/Ds1jeUSYo5pic.twitter.com/11coPEmP4Q

— Wall Street Journal (WSJ) April 28, 2016 Fourteen pregnant women have contracted the virus and six babies infected with Zika have developed malformations including microcephaly The World Health Organisation says there is strong scientific consensus that Zika causes microcephaly and \u201cGuillain-Barre\u00a0syndrome\u201d:http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/gbs/detail_gbs.htm,\u00a0a\u00a0rare\u00a0neurological condition that induces paralysis. The worst-case scenario in using genetically modified mosquitoes to fight Zika https://t.co/27WXlCvNce pic.twitter.com/JRfuVn8ncN\u2014 The Atlantic (@TheAtlantic) May 1, 2016 Authorities await conclusive proof, in the meantime health officials remain vigilant.", "dateCreated": "2016-05-05 07:40:39 +02:00", "dateModified": "2016-05-05 07:40:39 +02:00", "datePublished": "2016-05-05 07:40:39 +02:00", "image": { "@type": "ImageObject", "url": "https://static.euronews.com/articles/331855/1440x810_331855.jpg", "width": "1440px", "height": "810px", "caption": "The health ministry in Panama has confirmed the birth of four babies with microcephaly.", "thumbnail": "https://static.euronews.com/articles/331855/385x202_331855.jpg", "publisher": { "@type": "Organization", "name": "euronews", "url": "https://static.euronews.com/website/images/euronews-logo-main-blue-403x60.png" } }, "author": { "@type": "Person", "name": "Christopher Cummins", "url": "cummins", "sameAs": "https://twitter.com/euronews" }, "publisher": { "@type": "Organization", "name": "Euronews", "legalName": "Euronews", "url": "https://www.euronews.com/", "logo": { "@type": "ImageObject", "url": "https://static.euronews.com/website/images/euronews-logo-main-blue-403x60.png", "width": "403px", "height": "60px" }, "sameAs": [ "https://www.facebook.com/euronews", "https://twitter.com/euronews", "https://flipboard.com/@euronews", "https://www.instagram.com/euronews.tv/", "https://www.linkedin.com/company/euronews" ] }, "speakable": { "@type": "SpeakableSpecification", "xPath": [ "/html/head/title", "/html/head/meta[@name='description']/@content" ], "url": "https://www.euronews.com/2016/05/05/panama-babies-born-with-microcephaly-linked-to-zika" } }, { "@type": "WebSite", "name": "Euronews.com", "url": "https://www.euronews.com/", "potentialAction": { "@type": "SearchAction", "target": "https://www.euronews.com/search?query={search_term_string}", "query-input": "required name=search_term_string" }, "sameAs": [ "https://www.facebook.com/euronews", "https://twitter.com/euronews", "https://flipboard.com/@euronews", "https://www.instagram.com/euronews.tv/", "https://www.linkedin.com/company/euronews" ] } ] }
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Panama babies born with microcephaly linked to Zika

Panama babies born with microcephaly linked to Zika
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By Christopher Cummins with Agencies
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The health ministry in Panama has confirmed the birth of four babies with microcephaly.

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The health ministry in Panama has confirmed the birth of four babies with microcephaly.

#Zika virus may be even more dangerous than previously thought, Brazilian scientists say https://t.co/Mpmz9AeBPepic.twitter.com/SKaB4D7urA

— BBC News (World) (BBCWorld) <a href="https://twitter.com/BBCWorld/status/727045905862545408">May 2, 2016</a></blockquote> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>Public health officials are concerned about a surge in the condition linked to Zika and fear the virus could spread across Latin America and the Caribbean. <b></b> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"tw-align-center data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Brazil is in a new stage of the Zika crisis: Caring for infants with tragic birth defects. <a href="https://t.co/Ds1jeUSYo5">https://t.co/Ds1jeUSYo5</a> <a href="https://t.co/11coPEmP4Q">pic.twitter.com/11coPEmP4Q</a></p>&mdash; Wall Street Journal (WSJ) April 28, 2016

Fourteen pregnant women have contracted the virus and six babies infected with Zika have developed malformations including microcephaly
The World Health Organisation says there is strong scientific consensus that Zika causes microcephaly and “Guillain-Barre syndrome”:http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/gbs/detail_gbs.htm, a rare neurological condition that induces paralysis. > The worst-case scenario in using genetically modified mosquitoes to fight Zika https://t.co/27WXlCvNcepic.twitter.com/JRfuVn8ncN

— The Atlantic (@TheAtlantic) May 1, 2016

Authorities await conclusive proof, in the meantime health officials remain vigilant.

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