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No more AIDS by 2030?

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By Euronews
No more AIDS by 2030?

<p><span class="caps">HIV</span> is no longer a death sentence. However, people’s attitudes can make living with <span class="caps">HIV</span> extremely hard. Some things from the 1980s and 1990s are worth revisiting, but <span class="caps">HIV</span> stigma isn’t one of them. </p> <p>Since the start of the epidemic, 78 million people have become infected with <span class="caps">HIV</span> and 35 million people have died from <span class="caps">AIDS</span>-related illnesses (until the end of 2015). In 2015 there were 2.1 million new <span class="caps">HIV</span> infections worldwide, adding up to a total of 36.7 million people living with <span class="caps">HIV</span>. The number of <span class="caps">HIV</span>-infected people receiving therapy has increased by about a third, reaching 17 million people (46% of infected people) — two million more than the UN General Assembly’s 2015 target. The <span class="caps">WHO</span>’s ambitious target is to eradicate <span class="caps">AIDS</span> by 2030.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="fr"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Young people, particularly girls are at highest risk. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/HIVselftest?src=hash">#HIVselftest</a> is a new way to help more young people <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Test4HIV?src=hash">#Test4HIV</a> <a href="https://t.co/8m5mYGfjrH">https://t.co/8m5mYGfjrH</a> <a href="https://t.co/2oGRidKCEX">pic.twitter.com/2oGRidKCEX</a></p>— <span class="caps">WHO</span> African Region (@WHOAFRO) <a href="https://twitter.com/WHOAFRO/status/803944801100005376">30 novembre 2016</a></blockquote> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script> <p>But in the meantime, many people are still not being reached. Young people and adolescents, especially young women and girls, are still being left behind in the <span class="caps">AIDS</span> response. Adolescent girls and young women between 15–24 years old are at higher risk of <span class="caps">HIV</span> infection globally. In sub-Saharan Africa, adolescent girls and young women account for 25% of new <span class="caps">HIV</span> infections among adults. A lack of sufficient <span class="caps">HIV</span> diagnosis is a major obstacle on the path to eliminating the disease: more than 18 million people with <span class="caps">HIV</span> are currently taking antiretroviral therapy (<span class="caps">ART</span>), but a similar number is still unable to access treatment, the majority of whom are unaware of their <span class="caps">HIV</span> positive status. <span class="caps">HIV</span> self-testing should open the door for many more people to know their <span class="caps">HIV</span> status and find out how to get treatment and access prevention services.</p> <p>World <span class="caps">AIDS</span> Day, designated on 1 December every year since 1988, is dedicated to raising awareness of the <span class="caps">AIDS</span> pandemic caused by the spread of <span class="caps">HIV</span> infection, and mourning those who have died of the disease. </p> <iframe src="//e.infogr.am/ab9a7c35-a879-4d37-b44b-699fc9c63f45?src=embed" title="" width="550" height="1545" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" style="border:none;"></iframe> <p><strong><span class="caps">FACTS</span></strong></p> <ul> <li><strong>1. <span class="caps">ARE</span> <span class="caps">HIV</span> <span class="caps">AND</span> <span class="caps">AIDS</span> <span class="caps">THE</span> <span class="caps">SAME</span> <span class="caps">THING</span>?</strong><br /> No. When someone is described as living with <span class="caps">HIV</span>, they have the <span class="caps">HIV</span> virus in their body. A person is considered to have developed <span class="caps">AIDS</span> when the immune system is so weak it can no longer fight off a range of diseases with which it would normally cope.</li> </ul> <ul> <li><strong>2. <span class="caps">WILL</span> <span class="caps">HIV</span> <span class="caps">DEFINITELY</span> BE <span class="caps">PASSED</span> ON <span class="caps">DURING</span> <span class="caps">SEX</span> <span class="caps">BETWEEN</span> AN <span class="caps">HIV</span> <span class="caps">POSITIVE</span> <span class="caps">AND</span> AN <span class="caps">HIV</span> <span class="caps">NEGATIVE</span> <span class="caps">PERSON</span>?</strong><br /> During sex, it is not an automatic consequence that <span class="caps">HIV</span> will be transmitted. Compared with some other infectious diseases, risk of <span class="caps">HIV</span> infection from a single act of sex is usually low. There are other factors which can increase and reduce the risk of <span class="caps">HIV</span> transmission, and if someone living with <span class="caps">HIV</span> is on effective treatment, with an undetectable viral load, there is no risk of them passing on <span class="caps">HIV</span>. However a condom is still the safest and easiest way to prevent transmission.</li> </ul> <ul> <li><strong>3. <span class="caps">CAN</span> <span class="caps">YOU</span> <span class="caps">GET</span> <span class="caps">HIV</span> <span class="caps">FROM</span> <span class="caps">ORAL</span> <span class="caps">SEX</span>?</strong><br /> The risk of <span class="caps">HIV</span> transmission from performing oral sex is low but it can still happen. It is best to avoid giving oral sex if you have cuts or sores in your mouth or bleeding gums, as this increases the risk of <span class="caps">HIV</span> entering your body.</li> </ul> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="fr"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Men account for only 30% of people who have tested for <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/HIV?src=hash">#HIV</a> <a href="https://t.co/GROCuZtTmB">https://t.co/GROCuZtTmB</a> <a href="https://t.co/Er8NkoYgxk">pic.twitter.com/Er8NkoYgxk</a></p>— <span class="caps">WHO</span> (@WHO) <a href="https://twitter.com/WHO/status/803887699597918208">30 novembre 2016</a></blockquote> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script> <p><strong><span class="caps">MYTHS</span>:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong>1. <span class="caps">ONLY</span> <span class="caps">GAY</span> <span class="caps">MEN</span> <span class="caps">GET</span> <span class="caps">HIV</span></strong><br /> Gay men are particularly affected by <span class="caps">HIV</span> as a group but <span class="caps">HIV</span> can still affect anyone and there are many heterosexuals living with <span class="caps">HIV</span>. The majority of new <span class="caps">HIV</span> diagnoses in 2010 were acquired heterosexually. Anyone who has sex without a condom or shares needles when injecting drugs is at risk of <span class="caps">HIV</span>.</li> </ul> <ul> <li><strong>2. <span class="caps">YOU</span> <span class="caps">CAN</span> <span class="caps">GET</span> <span class="caps">HIV</span> <span class="caps">FROM</span> <span class="caps">SOMEONE</span> <span class="caps">WHO</span> <span class="caps">SPITS</span> AT <span class="caps">YOU</span> OR <span class="caps">BITES</span> <span class="caps">YOU</span></strong><br /> There is no risk of <span class="caps">HIV</span> infection from spitting and the risk of infection from biting is negligible. With over 60 million people infected with <span class="caps">HIV</span> worldwide over 25 years, there have only ever been four possible reports of <span class="caps">HIV</span> being transmitted through biting, all of which occurred in extremely specific and unusual circumstances.</li> </ul> <ul> <li><strong>3. <span class="caps">YOU</span> <span class="caps">CAN</span> <span class="caps">GET</span> <span class="caps">HIV</span> IF <span class="caps">YOU</span> <span class="caps">STAND</span> ON OR <span class="caps">PICK</span> UP A <span class="caps">USED</span> <span class="caps">NEEDLE</span></strong><br /> There has never been a case of <span class="caps">HIV</span> infection from picking up or standing on a used needle in the UK. There have only ever been five cases of <span class="caps">HIV</span> infection from being pricked with a needle, and these all occurred in healthcare settings and there have been none since 1999. <span class="caps">HIV</span> is a very fragile virus that does not survive for long when exposed to the environment.</li> </ul> <ul> <li><strong>4. <span class="caps">HIV</span> <span class="caps">CAN</span> BE <span class="caps">PASSED</span> ON <span class="caps">THROUGH</span> <span class="caps">SHARING</span> <span class="caps">RAZORS</span> OR <span class="caps">TOOTHBRUSHES</span></strong><br /> <span class="caps">HIV</span> cannot be passed on by sharing razors or toothbrushes, even if you are sharing with an <span class="caps">HIV</span> positive person. However, for general hygiene purposes it is advisable not to share these personal items as they do carry general bacteria.</li> </ul> <p>source: http://www.nat.org.uk/we-inform/FAQs-%26-Myths</p> <p>More data from 2016 (recent): http://www.unaids.org/en/resources/fact-sheet</p>