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French far left urge government to recognise State of Palestine

Supporters from the far-left La France Insoumise (Unbowed) party attend a political rally, Saturday, May 25, 2024  (AP Photo/Aurelien Morissard)
Supporters from the far-left La France Insoumise (Unbowed) party attend a political rally, Saturday, May 25, 2024 (AP Photo/Aurelien Morissard) Copyright Aurelien Morissard/Copyright 2024 The AP. All rights reserved.
Copyright Aurelien Morissard/Copyright 2024 The AP. All rights reserved.
By Euronews with AP
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The leader of France's far-left LFI party told supporters at a rally on Saturday it was time for the country to recognise Palestinian statehood.

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France's far left rallied on Saturday ahead of European elections. 

The leader of France’s far-left La France Insoumise (LFI) party told supporters at a rally now was the moment to officially recognise Palestine.

Jean-Luc Mélenchon spoke to supporters in the town of Aubervilliers, near Paris, as the campaign for the 2024 European elections enters its final weeks.

“France must recognize the Palestinian state now,” he said, “The balance of power must show that the whole world condemns this genocide.”

LFI candidate Manon Aubry also joined him on stage. She said her party would pursue sanctions against Israel if elected, as well as stopping sending arms shipments to the country.

Their comments come against a backdrop of mounting global condemnation of Israel's harsh military offensive in Gaza. 

Three European states — Spain, Ireland and Norway — announced on Wednesday they would formally recognise the Palestinian state, seven months after the Gaza war broke out. 

The highly symbolic move was coordinated between the three nations following months of negotiations between a group of European countries willing to take the step.

First proposed by the UN in 1947, the two-state solution envisions creating two separate nations: one for Jews (Israel) and one for Palestinians (Palestine). It would involve dividing the land, with each state having its own government. The goal is to allow both sides to live side by side peacefully and independently.

The move is opposed by Israel, which has claimed it will "fuel instability" in the Middle East.

Palestinian statehood has been recognised by 139 out of 193 United Nations (UN) member states to date. 

The European elections take place from June 6-9. 450 million people across the 27-member European Union will pick 720 lawmakers for the next five years.

In France, voting will begin on June 9.

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