Mapping the EU elections

Mapping the EU elections
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By Ana LAZARO
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This week we look at voter turnout and why it is so high or so low in different European countries.

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Low voter turnout is one of the great challenges of the European elections. In 2014, participation was only 42%. But there were big differences between countries.The member state with the highest level of participation was Belgium, with 89% ... as voting is compulsory

Followed closely behind by Luxembourg, where repeated no shows at the ballots can result a fine of up to 1000 euros.

The lowest levels of participation were in Slovakia with 13% and the Czech Republic with 18%

Other Eastern European countries such as Croatia, Slovenia, Poland and Hungary, also slipped under the 30% mark. And the question is: could populism get more voters to the ballot boxes?

When the level of participation is low we observe that the ones who tend to vote are those with a higher levels of education and they rarely vote for populists

Here's the answer of Political Sciences professor, Pascal Delwit:

"Not really, but if it goes in one sense it would be more against populists. When the level of participation is low we observe that the ones who tend to vote are those with a higher levels of education and they rarely vote for populists. Populists vote but in a lower degree. So it is there that we could see a growth against a eurosceptic wave or a far-right wave."

Video editor • Etienne Barthomeuf

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