Russia launches its biggest attack on Kyiv in weeks

In this photo provided by Serhii Popko, the head of the city's military administration, firefighters work at the site after Russian attacks in Kyiv, Ukraine, march 21
In this photo provided by Serhii Popko, the head of the city's military administration, firefighters work at the site after Russian attacks in Kyiv, Ukraine, march 21 Copyright AP/Serhii Popko, the head of the city's military administration
By Euronews with AP
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Russia launches its largest attack, in weeks on Kyiv, causing damage to structures and injuring several. As attacks from Russia are expected by experts to pick up again.

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Early Thursday, Russia launched more than two dozen missiles at Ukraine's capital, Kyiv, initiating a massive assault. Houses, educational facilities, and other civilian structures suffered damage in the attack. Reports indicate over a dozen injuries, with six schools and nurseries sustaining damage, and other structures catching fire from debris.

Approximately 25,000 individuals, including about 3,000 children, sought shelter in the city's subway stations as air raid sirens persisted for around three hours, according to officials. Despite the attack, all 31 missiles were intercepted by air defenses.

Russia's election are believed by experts to be the reason of the recent pause in air strikes, as well as the lack of munitions. However, air raids are now expected to be more frequent. 

Meanwhile, the foreign ministers of four Central European countries remain deeply divided on how to address Russia's aggression against Ukraine. Meeting on Thursday, the foreign ministers from the Czech Republic, Poland, Hungary, and Slovakia discussed a Czech proposal to acquire essential ammunition for Ukraine from non-European Union countries.

Czech Foreign Minister Jan Lipavsky emphasised the need to enhance support for Ukraine across all sectors, including military assistance. The Czech plan aims to procure 800,000 artillery shells for Ukraine, with deliveries anticipated as early as June. At least 18 countries have expressed interest in participating in this initiative.

Polish Foreign Minister Radek Sikorski praised the Czech proposal as an "excellent idea" and pledged Poland's financial support and assistance in delivering the ammunition to the frontline.

However, Hungarian Foreign Minister Peter Szijjarto reiterated Hungary's refusal to provide arms to Ukraine, emphasising their commitment to non-involvement in the conflict. Similarly, Slovakian Foreign Minister Juraj Blanar maintained their stance, stating that the conflict lacks a military solution and thus Slovakia remains unwilling to supply weapons to Ukraine.

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