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Groningen gas field: A dangerous place to live

FILE- Gas extraction in Slochteren, northern Netherlands, Friday, Jan. 19, 2018.
FILE- Gas extraction in Slochteren, northern Netherlands, Friday, Jan. 19, 2018. Copyright AP Photo
Copyright AP Photo
By Fernande von Tets
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More than 3,000 homes have had to be demolished due to earthquake damage and from 2015, gas production has been scaled down.

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When the Groningen gas field was discovered in 1959, it was a boon for the Dutch state, providing annual revenue of about 15 billion euros and laying the foundation for the country's welfare state. 

But in the 1980s, earthquakes began to plague residents until, in 2012, a huge earthquake served as a wake-up call. More than 3,000 homes have had to be demolished due to earthquake damage and from 2015, gas production has been scaled down. 

On October 1, the gas field closed down. But the fight for thousands of residents to be compensated continues.

Watch Fernande von Tets full report by clicking on the media player above.

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