'No mercy': Iran’s President warns anti-government protesters against continuing

Iranian President, Ebrahim Raisi, spoke at the funerals of 400 men who died in the Iran-Iraq war of the 1980s
Iranian President, Ebrahim Raisi, spoke at the funerals of 400 men who died in the Iran-Iraq war of the 1980s Copyright Vahid Salemi/Copyright 2022 The AP
By Euronews
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There will be “no pity” for those who show hostility to the Islamic Republic, according to Iran's President Ebrahim Raisi as anti-government protests pass the 100-day mark.

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There will be “no mercy” for those who show hostility to the Islamic Republic, according to Iran's President Ebrahim Raisi as anti-government protests pass the 100-day mark.

Speaking at state-organised commemorations for 400 soldiers killed in the 1980s Iran-Iraq war, the president lashed out at the United States and its allies, accusing them of fomenting anti-government protests that have been ongoing for more than three months now.

Iran has been shaken by unrest after the death of Mahsa Amini, a 22-year-old Iranian-Kurdish woman who died after being detained by the country’s morality police.

The protests rapidly escalated into calls to overthrow Iran’s theocracy, established after the 1979 Islamic Revolution. Its marked one of the biggest challenges to the Iranian clerical rule in more than four decades.

At least 507 protesters have been killed and more than 18,500 people have been arrested, according to Human Rights Activists in Iran, a group that has closely monitored the unrest. Iranian authorities have not released figures for those killed or arrested.

For more watch Euronews' report in the video above.

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