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French investigators wrap up probe into November 2015 Paris attacks, paving way for trial

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FILE PHOTO A commemorative plaque is seen at the entrance of the Bataclan concert venue after a ceremony marking the third anniversary of the Paris attacks of November 2015
FILE PHOTO A commemorative plaque is seen at the entrance of the Bataclan concert venue after a ceremony marking the third anniversary of the Paris attacks of November 2015 -
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Investigations into the November 2015 terror attacks which killed 130 people in a single day in Paris are now closed, prosecutors said in a statement on Monday, paving the way for a trial.

Investigations led to 14 indictments, prosecutors said, including 11 pre-trial detentions.

Three other suspects are awaiting trial under judicial supervision, the statement said.

Arrest warrants are out for six more people suspected of involvement, at least some of whom are believed to have been killed in fighting in Syria or Iraq.

Anti-terror prosecutors now have up to one month to present their conclusions to the judges, who will then announce a trial date.

There will be 1,740 civil parties to the case, the statement said.

Deadliest attacks since World War Two

On November 13, 2015, France’s national football stadium, cafés, restaurants and a concert hall were targeted by a series of coordinated attacks, for which the so-called Islamic State group claimed responsibility.

The attacks began with suicide blasts outside the Stade de France, the national stadium north of Paris, during a friendly football match between France and Germany attended by then-president Francois Hollande.

Outside the Bataclan theatre, 90 people were gunned down during a rock concert.

The attacks were the deadliest in France since World War Two.

Seven attackers, most of whom had French or Belgian citizenship, were killed.

Salah Abdeslam, the sole surviving suspected attacker, is in a French prison awaiting his trial, which may not take place until late 2020.

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