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BREAKING NEWS

BREAKING NEWS

Trump says still-in-the-works GOP healthcare plan won't be voted on until after 2020

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Trump says still-in-the-works GOP healthcare plan won't be voted on until after 2020
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President Donald Trump said as part of a string of Monday night tweets that Republicans won't be voting on a new healthcare plan until after the 2020 elections.

"The Republicans are developing a really great HealthCare Plan with far lower premiums (cost) & deductibles than ObamaCare," Trump tweeted.

"In other words it will be far less expensive & much more usable than ObamaCare. Vote will be taken right after the Election when Republicans hold the Senate & win back the House."

The comment comes as the Trump administration has abruptly shifted its focus back to healthcare over the past 10 days, beginning with Trump directing the Department of Justice to support a full dismantling of the Affordable Care Act on constitutional grounds.

The Justice Department intervened in a federal case on behalf of a Texas judge who ruled the law is unconstitutional because of the new Republican tax law. The move appeared to catch Republicans off guard. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said the White House would be the big player in the latest healthcare battle, while Senate Finance Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, said last week his committee did not have plans to move forward with healthcare legislation.

After making the repeal and replacement of the Affordable Care Act, President Barack Obama's signature healthcare law, central to campaigning over the past decade, Republicans were unable to do such when they had control of the White House, Senate and House during the first two years of Trump's presidency.

With healthcare polling as a top issue for voters in the 2018 midterms, Democrats were able to win back control of the House by flipping 40 GOP-controlled seats.