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I missed the eclipse - where can I watch it back?

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By Emma Beswick
I missed the eclipse - where can I watch it back?

<p>A total solar eclipse made its way across the <span class="caps">USA</span> yesterday (August 21), a phenomenon that last occurred in the States 99 years ago.</p> <p>Where was the best place to view the spectacle, and for enthusiasts outside the US, where can they watch footage of the eclipse?</p> <h2>What is the ‘path of totality’?</h2> <p>Anyone viewing the spectacle from under the ‘path of totality’ had prime seats and bore witness to a full solar eclipse, which occurs when the sun and the moon perfectly align, plunging the area into darkness.</p> <p>The 110-kilometre-wide path swept across the US as expected, making its way from Oregon in the west to South Carolina in the east. </p> <p><img src="https://static.euronews.com/articles/38/38/383878/640x325_bonus-map.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p><span class="caps">NASA</span> provided detailed <a href="https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/eclipse-maps">pictures</a> on its website of which areas in 14 states are in the ‘path of totality’ and at what time the full eclipse occurred.</p> <p>Sky gazers lucky enough to watch the eclipse from the path of totality took to social media to share their footage.</p> <p><iframe class="player" frameborder="0" src="//www.facebook.com/video/embed?video_id=10155410021056413"></iframe></p> <h2>What did those in Europe see during the eclipse?</h2> <p>Europe didn’t fall under the path of totality, so no one was treated to a full solar eclipse. They did, however, see a partial solar eclipse, where the sun looked like it has a bite taken out of it.</p> <p>One spectator in West Yorkshire, UK, uploaded a video of the eclipse in his region to Facebook.</p> <p><iframe class="player" frameborder="0" src="//www.facebook.com/video/embed?video_id=10152780558828391"></iframe></p> <h2><span class="caps">NASA</span>’s space baloon</h2> <p>Even if you couldn’t see the total eclipse where you were, a team of researchers from Montana State University partnered with <span class="caps">NASA</span> and used 50 high-altitude balloons to follow the spectacle and <a href="http://eclipse.stream.live/">stream it live</a>.</p> <p>The <a href="http://eclipse.montana.edu/">Eclipse Baloon Project</a> sent the balloons up 24,000 metres to offer millions a view of the eclipse as it crossed the country.</p> <p>The team carried out a test launch on Thursday (August 17).</p> <p><img src="https://static.euronews.com/articles/38/38/383878/640x450_bonus-balloon.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p><img src="https://static.euronews.com/articles/38/38/383878/640x934_bonus-balloon2.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p><img src="https://static.euronews.com/articles/38/38/383878/640x375_bonus-balloon4.jpg" alt="" /></p> <h2>Don’t throw your eclipse glasses, donate them instead</h2> <p><a href="https://astronomerswithoutborders.org/">Astronomers Without Borders</a> (<span class="caps">AWB</span>) incited those who watched the eclipse in America not to throw their safety glasses, but to donate them instead.</p> <p>The institution tweeted saying they would be collecting the glasses to pass on to schools in South America and Asia – the continents that will witness a total solar eclipse in 2019.</p> <p><blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Give your <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/eclipseglasses?src=hash">#eclipseglasses</a> 2nd chance! We will b collecting glasses 2 S.Amer & Asia schools 4 eclipse’19. Info coming.Don’t waste. Donate! <a href="https://t.co/wNlH6Eyc4D">pic.twitter.com/wNlH6Eyc4D</a></p>— Astro w/o Borders (@awb_org) <a href="https://twitter.com/awb_org/status/898961021666299905">August 19, 2017</a></blockquote><br /> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p>