Quarter of Romanian youth suffering from severe material and social deprivation

In this photo taken on Monday, Dec. 19, 2016, a homeless person talks with a social worker on the shower bus, run by the Greek Praksis, an NGO, in central Athens.
In this photo taken on Monday, Dec. 19, 2016, a homeless person talks with a social worker on the shower bus, run by the Greek Praksis, an NGO, in central Athens. Copyright AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis
Copyright AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis
By Euronews
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Romania also has the highest rate of rate young people not working or in training.

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A quarter of Romanian youth (25.4%) is suffering from severe material and social deprivation, according to Eurostat.

This is the highest rate in the European Union and more than four times the average of 6% for the whole 27-country bloc.

Severe material and social deprivation is described as an enforced lack of necessary and desirable items to lead an adequate life. 

Young people aged 15-29 are seen as suffering from it if they are unable to meet seven out of 13 criteria including a capacity to face unexpected expenses, to keep their home adequately warm, to replace worn-out furniture, clothes or shoes, to have access to a car for personal use, or to have an internet connection among others.

Sociologists say it's due to a lack of social policies and paid jobs. In 2022, Romania also had the highest rate of 15-29 year-olds that were neither in employment nor in education and training at 19.8%, well above the EU average of 11.7%.

Bulgaria at 18.6% has the second-highest rate in the EU with Greece coming in third with a 14.9% rate.

On the other hand, the proportion was less than 3% in 12 European states such as In contrast, the rate was below 3% in 12 EU members: Slovenia, Austria, Luxembourg, Croatia, Poland, Czechia, the Netherlands, Estonia, Malta, Cyprus, Finland and Sweden.

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