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Fresh wave of terror attacks should be expected, says terrorism expert

Belgian Police stand behind a cordoned off area close to where a suspected Tunisian extremist has been shot dead hours after manhunt looking for him Tuesday, Oct. 17, 2023.
Belgian Police stand behind a cordoned off area close to where a suspected Tunisian extremist has been shot dead hours after manhunt looking for him Tuesday, Oct. 17, 2023. Copyright Martin Meissner/Copyright 2023 The AP. All rights reserved
Copyright Martin Meissner/Copyright 2023 The AP. All rights reserved
By Sandor Zsiros
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Europe and the world must prepare itself for more terror attacks, according to a Belgian terrorism specialist.

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Claude Moniquet was speaking to Euronews following an attack in Brussels that left two dead Monday and an overnight manhunt, ending in the suspect being shot by police.

"I think we were going to have a wave of terrorism in the world. It could be in Europe - it is in Europe," he said.

"Today, it is in France and Belgium. It could be tomorrow in the United States, maybe anywhere, but there's going to be a terrorist shock that's going to follow what's happening in the Middle East."

The attack in Brussels was the second terrorist attack in Europe in a matter of days following the murder of a teacher in the French city of Arras last week by a suspected jihadist.

Experts have warned that the conflict between Israel and Hamas could encourage more attacks, something Moniquet also believes.

"What is happening in Israel is a new motivation. It is a new incentive which allows jihad to resurface and increase, but fundamentally, we must understand that radical Islam is the basic problem behind it and that terrorism is just a tool that comes out when it has a good pretext to come out," the terrorism expert told Euronews.

Moniquet did add, however, that there is little risk of having large-scale coordinated terrorist attacks in Europe, given that there is no capacity left for that. Instead, attacks by individuals are more likely.

"Today, what we have is more individual attacks or attacks in very small family or friend-related units," he said. 

"Mogouchkov, the man who attacked in Arras, worked with his family, his little brother, a cousin, his big brother who was already in prison.

"These are the kinds of things that we are going to see, that we are likely to see and it is very difficult to counter because the intelligence services can attack a network, because in a network, you have to communicate, you have to telephone, you have to exchange emails, you have to meet.

"If you work on preparing an attack with your brother, no one is going to see it."

Moniquet also said that European governments should start to intensify their intelligence gathering and sharing in order to help thwart further attacks.

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