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Watch: Scientists farm a superfood in the North Sea

Norwegian start-up turns to kelp to answer global climate crisis
Norwegian start-up turns to kelp to answer global climate crisis Copyright Weronika Jurkiewicz
Copyright Weronika Jurkiewicz
By Sharifah Fadhilah AlshahabWeronika Jurkiewicz
Published on Updated
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In a region with limited daylight, Kelpinor relies on the technological tricks it has up its sleeve for growing seaweed.

Seaweed has been a staple on many Asian plates for centuries but is less popular with Western palates. However, a Norwegian team hopes change is on the horizon.

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"They're not that big yet, but the demand for seaweed is rising," says Hermann Schips, co-founder of Kelpinor. This startup company farms seaweed in northern regions of Norway, aiming to diversify the country's aquaculture industry, which is traditionally known for salmon production.

Seaweeds offer an ocean of possibilities as it has many of the building blocks for making cosmetics and even plastics
Seaweeds offer an ocean of possibilities as it has many of the building blocks for making cosmetics and even plasticsKelpinor

Sustainably cultivating kelp, nori and kombu, commonly known as seaweed can have a positive effect on the environment by absorbing excess nutrients from the water, reducing carbon dioxide levels, and providing habitat for marine life.

Watch how Kelpinor is changing the face of kelp farming. Seaweed is not only a nutrient-rich food source, but can also be used in animal feed and biofuel production.

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