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Mariupol escapees 'have to pass through Russian filtration camps'

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By Euronews
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Donetsk People Republic Emergency Situations Ministry employees clear rubble at the side of the damaged Mariupol theater building during heavy fighting in Mariupol
Donetsk People Republic Emergency Situations Ministry employees clear rubble at the side of the damaged Mariupol theater building during heavy fighting in Mariupol   -   Copyright  Credit: AP

People wanting to leave devastated Mariupol have to go through Russian filtration camps, Euronews has learned. 

A local woman told our international correspondent Anelise Borges that all men -- and women under 60 -- are sent there for questioning.

Giving a flavour of life in the city, she said road signs had been changed into Russian, there was an information blackout with no internet, and that clean water was hard to find. She said she'd also been told she had to re-register her house with the new authorities to avoid losing it. 

Mariupol, on the frontline of Russia's invasion and 90% destroyed according to its mayor, was the scene of the Azovstal steelworks siege, which saw nearly 1,000 fighters holed up inside, holding out for weeks against Russian bombardment.

Borges is currently embedded up with Ukrainian troops near Kherson, who tell her they are confident of retaking the city.

She said the towns and villages behind the frontline in Kherson had been "scarred by fierce fighting".

Watch more in the video player, above.