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Bayern win sixth Champions League title in 1-0 victory against PSG

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Bayern's Thomas Mueller, right, celebrates after winning the Champions League final soccer match between Paris Saint-Germain and Bayern Munich.
Bayern's Thomas Mueller, right, celebrates after winning the Champions League final soccer match between Paris Saint-Germain and Bayern Munich.   -   Copyright  David Ramos/AP
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Bayern Munich won their sixth Champions League title on Sunday in a 1-0 victory over Paris Saint-Germain.

Kingsley Coman’s second-half goal gave the German team a 1-0 victory over PSG.

The final was tight with a few chances for either team until the French winger saw the chance to score from teammate Joshua Kimmich’s cross.

The match was played during COVID-19 restrictions, was played at Benfica’s Estádio da Luz in Lisbon.

The German team is not new to such big victories, having already conquered the most important European title for clubs five times - in 1974, 1975, 1976, 2001 and 2013.

For PSG, instead, it was unmissable chance to finally extend its dominion outside of France - where it conquered seven national titles in the past eight seasons - failing however to win anything on a European level.

The two teams have few things in common. Both are managed by a German coach, Thomas Tuchel for PSG and Hansi-Dieter Flick for Bayern.

But most importantly, Sunday's game was an opportunity for both teams to complete the "treble".

In other words, winning all the three most important competitions of the season - the national title, the national cup and the Champions League, something achieved only eight times in Europe's football history - and by Bayern too, in 2013.

The German team, which currently holds the n.1 place in the UEFA ranking, crushed FC Barcelona 8-2 in the semi-finals, inflicting the Spanish team their worst defeat in almost 80 years.

PSG had instead a more comfortable route into the final, knocking out the underdogs - but nonetheless surprising - Atalanta (Italy) and RB Leipzig (Germany).

The final also marks the end of the longest and most singular Champions League.

Due to delays caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, it is finishing 425 days after the first game was played.

The competition resumed in August with a mini-tournament which saw teams playing in single-leg games beginning with the quarterfinals, a formula which many fans liked due to its high-load of suspense, and that UEFA is considering to retain - with some changes - in the future.