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In pictures: Coronavirus and Greta Thunberg among themes at Sitges Carnival

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In pictures: Coronavirus and Greta Thunberg among themes at Sitges Carnival
Copyright  Oliver Miocic/Euronews
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Sitges Carnival near Barcelona is known for its weird, wonderful - and topical - costumes, and this year was no different.

Two carnival aficionados - Ulrich Malsch, 56, and Yorlen Perez, 43 - attended the event in medical safety suits amid rising concern over the spread of the COVID-19 virus.

Although some might see making light of a virus that has so far killed several hundred people a little close to the bone, Malsch and Perez, 43, explained that their costumes were meant to be a bit of fun.

"I think that most of all we have got to laugh in the face of adversities because daily life is tough enough," Malsch said.

Oliver Miocic/Euronews
Sitges Carnival 2020 participants wearing safety suits, prompted by COVID-19 coronavirus outbreak.Oliver Miocic/Euronews

Sitges Carnival is being celebrated this year between 20-26 of February, with 2,200 dancers and musicians parading on 43 floats through the town.

One was a three-metre-high blue elephant surrounded by performers dressed in traditional Indian clothing.

Oliver Miocic/Euronews
Sitges Carnival 2020, Spain.Oliver Miocic/Euronews

The event costs the municipality €235,000, but the organisers are expecting more than 300,000 people to attend, signifying a huge boost to the local economy.

Oliver Miocic/Euronews
Sitges Carnival 2020, Spain.Oliver Miocic/Euronews
Oliver Miocic/Euronews
Sitges Carnival 2020, Spain.Oliver Miocic/Euronews

The COVID-19 outbreak was not the only topic that inspired this year's participants. Euronews correspondent Oliver Miočić spotted a dancer dressed as the climate activist Greta Thunberg.

Oliver Miocic/Euronews
A dancer dressed as the teenage climate activist Greta Thunberg complete with her trademark yellow rain jacket and school strike sign.Oliver Miocic/Euronews

Sitges is popular with the LGBTQ+ community, and organiser David Martínez explained he wanted the week-long festivity to embrace "respect and civility without sexist behaviour or homophobia.”

Oliver Miocic/Euronews
Dancers at Sitges Carnival 2020Oliver Miocic/Euronews
Oliver Miocic/Euronews
Sitges CarnivalOliver Miocic/Euronews

Raul Garcia, 56, who is originally from Cuba, told Euronews: "Sex doesn’t have genders. The most important thing for me is that people are happy. It’s about the heart."

Oliver Miocic/Euronews
Raul Garcia from Cuba at Sitges Carnival, SpainOliver Miocic/Euronews

And the partying doesn't stop after the parades end, night clubs stay open for wild parties until the early hours of the morning.

By that point, fancy dress costumes and wigs aren't looking as pristine as they did at the start of the night.

Oliver Miocic/Euronews
Sitges Carnival 2020, SpainOliver Miocic/Euronews