BREAKING NEWS

Trump's former top Russia aide set to testify in impeachment inquiry

 Comments
Fiona Hill
Fiona Hill, senior director for European and Russian Affairs on the National Security Council, listens as President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg in the Cabinet Room of the White House on April 2, 2019. -
Copyright
Evan Vucci AP file
Euronews logo
Text size Aa Aa

Fiona Hill, who until August served as President Donald Trump's top Russia analyst, is set to testify to the House privately on Monday under subpoena as part of the impeachment inquiry into the president.

Previously, she agreed to testify at Congress' written request.

Hill plans to tell Congress that Trump's personal attorney Rudy Giuliani and U.S. Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland circumvented the administration to pursue a shadow foreign policy on Ukraine, a person familiar with her expected testimony told NBC News last week. A former senior White House official told NBC News that Hill's appearance has caused concern among those close to Trump because she played a central role in the administration's Russian and Ukrainian policy.

Hill's testimony comes after Marie Yovanovitch, the ousted U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, told House investigators last week that Trump pressured the State Department to remove her. Pushing for Yovanovitch's ouster was central to an effort from two Soviet-born business associates of Giuliani who now face federal charges over campaign-finance violations.

And Hill's testimony comes before Sondland is set to testify Thursday that he did not know why congressionally approved military aid to Ukraine was withheld, a person with knowledge of his testimony told NBC News. Sondland is set to say he "relied" on Trump's pledge that there was no quid pro quo with regard to Ukraine investigating the Biden family and a conspiracy theory involving the 2016 presidential election when Sondland texted the current top diplomat in Ukraine last month saying no quid pro quo was taking place.

Euronews is no longer accessible on Internet Explorer. This browser is not updated by Microsoft and does not support the last technical evolutions. We encourage you to use another browser, such as Edge, Safari, Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox.