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Voters go left on issues, but not candidates

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Voters go left on issues, but not candidates
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WASHINGTON - When it comes to issues and issue agendas, there is good news and bad news for Democrats in 2020 in the latest NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll.On the good news side of the ledger, there some key issues where voters seem supportive of left-leaning ideasand approaches. The bad news, a leftward-lean does not mean a leftward rush. If Democratic candidates push too hard in the primaries they may find themselves with problems in the general election.The issue agreements and differences with registered voters and Democratic primary voters are eye-opening and, in some cases, surprising.One number that jumps out of the data, 58 percent of registered voters in the survey say they support "providing free tuition at state colleges and universities." That's lower than the 81 percent of Democratic primary voters who support the idea and there's a lot of wiggle room in how respondents may have interpreted the question (would it be means-tested?), but it's still a majority.And there are a series of issues like that one, where Democrats seem to have registered voters in their corner on topics ranging from immigration and student debt to health care and the environment.

For instance, 67 percent of registered voters and 89 percent of Democratic primary voters say they favor allowing young adults who were brought illegally to this country to stay here to attend college. On student debt, 64 percent of registered voters and 82 percent of Democratic primary voters favor forgiving student loans after someone has paid 12.5 percent of their income every year for 15 years.The two groups are also in agreement on offering a health insurance "public option" for people younger than 65 who want to buy into it, 67 percent and 78 percent favor that idea respectively. And both registered voters and Democratic primary voters favor "shifting the country to 100 percent renewable energy and stopping the use of coal, oil, natural gas, and nuclear power by the year 2030" - 52 percent and 81 percent support that idea.Those are numbers that should bring smiles to the faces of Democrats. They show a lot of broad support on some major issues that Democrats say they favor and seem to suggest Democrats are in a good spot to win voters in 2020.For the record, the data also show that both registered voters and Democratic primary voters oppose building a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border and oppose eliminating the Affordable Care Act.

But there is another set of numbers in the poll that show the challenges Democrats could face on these same issues if their nominee heads down a path that goes a little further to the left.

On immigration, 64 percent of Democratic primary voters want to give undocumented immigrants government health care, only 36 percent of registered voters want that. When it comes to student debt, 60 percent of Democratic primary voters say they favor immediately canceling and forgiving all current student loan debt, but only 41 percent of registered voters support that idea.A solid 63 percent of Democratic primary voters back a "Medicare for all" single-payer health care system "in which private health insurance would be eliminated" - only 41 percent of registered voters agree. And while 58 percent of Democratic primary voters support an end to the practice of "fracking" for oil and gas production, only 41 percent of registered voters feel the same way.Those are some wide gaps and the splits show that winning general election support is not just about talking about the right issues (clean energy, fixing student debt), it's about talking about them in the right way.The registered voter answers on these questions suggest that the U.S. electorate become a center-left entity in the last few elections, one that is embracing more liberal action on issues such as climate change, health care and college costs.But these numbers also suggest that the "center-left" is not the "left" and that's where many Democratic primary voters reside.The next six to eight months will determine where the Democratic nominee eventually ends up on these issues. And if the party's nominee moves too far too fast to placate primary voters, he or she may end up standing on uncomfortable ground next November.