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Russia confirms ISS-bound Progress spaceship lost after launch

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By Alasdair Sandford  with AP, Reuters
Russia confirms ISS-bound Progress spaceship lost after launch

<p>Russia’s space agency has confirmed that an unmanned cargo ship launched on Thursday to take supplies to the International Space Station has been lost.</p> <p>Roscosmos said on Twitter that the ship had been destroyed during its launch. It is said to have mainly burnt up in the atmosphere, 190 kilometres above Siberia.</p> <p>Earlier, the space agency said that data transmissions had been cut off nearly six and a half minutes after the launch.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Roscosmos: <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/ProgressMS04?src=hash">#ProgressMS04</a> failed to reach orbit due to a failure of the third stage of the <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Soyuz?src=hash">#Soyuz</a> U rocket around 190km above South Siberia.</p>— <span class="caps">ISS</span> Updates (@ISS101) <a href="https://twitter.com/ISS101/status/804381869701758977">December 1, 2016</a></blockquote> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script> <p>The <span class="caps">TASS</span> news agency had quoted a source as saying the cargo ship was “very probably lost”, believing at that stage that it may have come down in China or the Pacific Ocean.</p> <p>Progress 65 took off from Kazakhstan with more than two and a half metric tons of food and other items for the <span class="caps">ISS</span> crew. </p> <p>It entered into orbit and had been expected to dock with the space station on Saturday.</p> <p><span class="caps">NASA</span> said supply levels were good and whatever happened with Progress, the six-member crew on board should not be affected.</p> <p>The space station is currently inhabited by two <span class="caps">NASA</span> astronauts, three Russian cosmonauts and one member of the European Space Agency.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr"><a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Roscosmos?src=hash">#Roscosmos</a> reports that <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/ProgressMS04?src=hash">#ProgressMS04</a> accident took place at an altitude of 190 kilometers. Here is good bye shot: <a href="https://t.co/WrnjZjDJCU">https://t.co/WrnjZjDJCU</a> <a href="https://t.co/ILEvBlghj5">pic.twitter.com/ILEvBlghj5</a></p>— Anatoly Zak (@RussianSpaceWeb) <a href="https://twitter.com/RussianSpaceWeb/status/804383566524252161">December 1, 2016</a></blockquote> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>