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Eid al-Fitr 2015: Muslims mark the end of Ramadan around the world

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By Euronews
Eid al-Fitr 2015: Muslims mark the end of Ramadan around the world

<p>Muslims around the world have been celebrating Eid al-Fitr which marks the end of the fasting month of Ramadan.</p> <p>Lasting several days the festival began with the start of the lunar month of Shawwal which differs every year.</p> <p><strong>Iraq</strong></p> <p>The day begins with prayer, however, in Iraq the so-called Islamic State group has issued a warning to the residents of Mosul to avoid Eid al-Fitr prayers.</p> <p>In Baghdad, security was tightened around places of worship.</p> <p>“We hope there will be peace and security in Iraq and may all the displaced families return to their homes, wishing al Iraqis the best of luck,” Salman Al Jumali, a worshiper in Baghdad told reporters.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Eid prayers <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Adhamiya?src=hash">#Adhamiya</a> in <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Baghdad?src=hash">#Baghdad</a> of Abu Hanifa mosque Happy Eid <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Iraq?src=hash">#Iraq</a> <a href="http://t.co/PqnQ6teo0K">pic.twitter.com/PqnQ6teo0K</a></p>— #IRAQ شمرية العراق (@moonnor27) <a href="https://twitter.com/moonnor27/status/621940502250696704">July 17, 2015</a></blockquote> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script> <p><strong>Gaza</strong></p> <p>In Gaza, the signs of last year’s 50-days of fighting with Israel remain visible, though there were no threats of violence, the impact could still be felt. </p> <p>“Before the war we used to prepare cookies and sweets and buy clothing for our children it was a real Eid. But this Eid I cannot even prepare cookies it will cost me 800 shekels and I don’t even have 100 shekels,” explained one resident.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Subhanallah so beautiful. From Eid prayer in Gaza today. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Eid?src=hash">#Eid</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/PrayForGaza?src=hash">#PrayForGaza</a> <a href="http://t.co/OrWCCXkThF">pic.twitter.com/OrWCCXkThF</a></p>— Abbas Sarsour (@iFalasteen) <a href="https://twitter.com/iFalasteen/status/621937749214433280">July 17, 2015</a></blockquote> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script> <p><strong>Turkey</strong> </p> <p>While many in Istanbul hit the road for a four-day break causing traffic chaos, those who remained the city celebrated with a selection of local delicacies. In Turkey the Ramadan Feast goes by the alternative name of ‘Sugar Feast’.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="en"><p lang="tr" dir="ltr">The Sugar Feast (Şeker Bayramı or Eid ul-Fitr) is the three day festival following Ramadan. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/istanbul?src=hash">#istanbul</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/sugar?src=hash">#sugar</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/feast?src=hash">#feast</a> <a href="http://t.co/QxR5qBTpzP">pic.twitter.com/QxR5qBTpzP</a></p>— İstanbul <span class="caps">LOOK</span> (@IstanLOOK) <a href="https://twitter.com/IstanLOOK/status/493684291948130304">July 28, 2014</a></blockquote> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>