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Burberry unveils coat collection made from fabric scraps and fishing nets

Burberry unveils coat collection made from fabric scraps and fishing nets

Just this week, Burberry has revealed the launch of a new eco-friendly collection in an attempt to join the circular economy in fashion. Four Instagram posts over two days unveil the luxury label’s staple coats, such as the Jacquard Parka and classic car coat, remade through sustainable means this time.

The coat collection is manufactured from ECONYL® by Aquafil, a nylon yarn made from raw ingredients such as industrial plastic, floating rubbish and nets from the ocean and textile scraps from factories. Burberry claims to be ‘disrupting’ the industry, with the new ECONYL® line, by repurposing plastic strewn in oceans and saving fabric waste from going to landfill simultaneously.

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What is in the collection?

So far, Burberry's new collection comprises of coats and jackets:

The Monogram Jacquard Parka. A modern silhouette, accentuated with logo-print taping and jacquard-textures.

A modern reinvention of the classic shape, the Car Coat is reimagined in ECONYL®.

The Cape Detail ECONYL® Coat. A fluid silhouette, stamped with the refreshed Burberry logo.

The brand states on Instagram:

“We’re disrupting and improving how we create our products to support circularity – by reducing plastic, repurposing fabric and finding new technologies to create the materials of the future. We are committed to a zero-waste mindset and have a goal to become carbon neutral by 2022.”

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Why is Burberry starting to produce sustainably sourced collections?

Ever since Burberry was criticised in 2018 for destroying unsold clothes, accessories and perfume, rather than recycling or repurposing them, the luxury brand has increased its efforts to appear more sustainable. At the time, sources speculated that Burberry didn’t want to risk its products falling into the wrong hands, where they could be sold at discount prices, thus devaluing the brand. However, this was not seen as a justifiable reason and the brand was met with criticism from all sides, before it decided to change tack and reverse this practice.

Burberry’s new ECONYL® capsule collection is testament to the brand’s environmental revamp. In the brand’s newest press release, Pam Batty, in charge of VP Corporate Responsibility at Burberry, commented:

“Exploring and using innovative materials that foster circularity is central to creating a more sustainable fashion industry. We are proud to use the ECONYL® yarn in this collection because it shows how we can actively tackle a problem like plastic waste and create beautiful, luxury products at the same time.”

“This collection is just one of the ways Burberry is actively disrupting and improving every stage of how we create our products because we know our industry can play a key role in building a more sustainable future through science and innovation”.

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