Students protest pension reform in France as union cuts power to Stade de France in ‘symbolic move’

Students shout slogans during a protest in Lyon, central France, Thursday.
Students shout slogans during a protest in Lyon, central France, Thursday. Copyright AP Photo/Laurent Cipriani
By Euronews with AFP, AP
Share this articleComments
Share this articleClose Button
Copy/paste the article video embed link below:Copy to clipboardCopied

Young people in universities and high schools across France took to the streets on Thursday to protest the government’s attempt to raise the retirement age from 62 to 64.

ADVERTISEMENT

Young people across France took to the streets on Thursday to protest the government’s attempt t to raise the retirement age to 64. 

Several hundred students protested in Paris as part of nationwide strikes and demonstrations - with some blocking access to universities and high schools.

The protest briefly turned violent as a group of young people broke away, vandalizing bus stops and setting a car on fire.

The energy branch of France's prominent union, CGT, cut power to the Stade de France and several construction sites of the infrastructure for the 2024 Paris Olympics on Thursday. 

Cédric Liechti, the Secretary General of CGT Energy, said the move was a “symbolic action”.

“For two and a half months now, more than 90% of workers and more than 70% of French people have rejected this reform which will bring the entire French people to their knees. The government refuses to hear, refuses to apply democracy and the majority of the people.”

AP Photo
A man plays the trumpet in front of a barricade during a demonstration in Lyon, central France.AP Photo

President Emmanuel Macron wants to raise the retirement age from 62 to 64 and make other changes he says are needed to keep the public pension system financially stable as the population ages.

But opponents argue that wealthy taxpayers or companies should pitch in more to finance the system instead.

“I don’t want to work all my life and be exhausted at the end,” said Djana Farhaig, a 15-year-old who protested in Paris. “It is important for us to show that the youth is engaged for its future.”

Demonstrations also took place in Rouen, where some 400 people marched. And in Toulouse, where 400 to 500 people gathered.

Blockades were also organised in several high schools and universities.

In Strasbourg, three university buildings were reportedly blocked. In Lille, for the second consecutive day, the Moulins campus of the university was blocked by 50 to 100 students with banners and drums, according to the faculty.

Share this articleComments

You might also like

Paris Rubbish strike continues as pension reform approved by senate

'Sharenting': Why is France trying to stop parents from oversharing their children's images online?

Strikes in France: Is it a tactic that actually works to change the government's mind?