COP15 summit: Deforestation rule is welcomed by Indigenous leaders

The UN's COP15 biodiversity summit is underway in Montreal, Canada.
The UN's COP15 biodiversity summit is underway in Montreal, Canada. Copyright AFP
By Euronews
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Indigenous communities around the world have "enthusiastically" welcomed the European Union's new law on deforestation, but they are demanding more laws to protect human, land, and forest rights.

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Indigenous communities around the world have "enthusiastically" welcomed the European Union's new law on deforestation, but they are demanding more laws to protect human, land, and forest rights.

Once adopted and applied, the bill will ensure that goods sold in the EU and elsewhere in the world no longer contribute to deforestation.

While the law will make some progress, Indigenous leaders say, it doesn't include all ecosystems in the world.

"At least three-quarters of Cerrado biome was left out from the obligation,"  Dinamam Tuxam, executive coordinator of the Articulation of Indigenous Peoples in Brazil said.

"Which will impact at least 110 mainly Indigenous communities. Traditional people will be directly impacted by this law that didn't cover all Brazilian biomes."

Leaders of Indigenous communities are calling for their voices to be "taken into consideration" at the UN's COP15 meeting in Montreal, Canada. 

Climate experts say their territories are home to 80% of the Earth's remaining biodiversity.

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