EventsEventsPodcasts
Loader
Find Us
ADVERTISEMENT

US transition: Trump continues attempt to cast doubt on election results

A sign in support of President Donald Trump is seen in the yard of Jasper County Republican Party chairman Thad Nearmyer, Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020, near Monroe, Iowa.
A sign in support of President Donald Trump is seen in the yard of Jasper County Republican Party chairman Thad Nearmyer, Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020, near Monroe, Iowa. Copyright Charlie Neibergall/Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.
Copyright Charlie Neibergall/Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.
By Euronews
Published on
Share this articleComments
Share this articleClose Button
Copy/paste the article video embed link below:Copy to clipboardCopied

Former New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, a longtime ally of the president, blasted Trump's legal team, calling their work a "legal embarrassment" in an interview with ABC.

ADVERTISEMENT

The US election transition is moving ahead, with President-elect Joe Biden set to name key cabinet members this week, even as President Donald Trump refuses to concede the election.

A growing number of Republicans are meanwhile urging the president to concede defeat as his legal challenges fail to gain traction.

Former New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, a longtime ally of the president, blasted Trump's legal team, calling their work a "legal embarrassment" in an interview with ABC.

Battleground states are moving forward with certifying the election results in the meantime.

The Trump team is appealing a Pennsylvania judge's decision to dismiss a lawsuit attempting to invalidate millions of votes. The move paves the way for the state to certify the election results.

Many Republicans say that the Trump administration should not hinder a smooth transition, though some have stayed silent on the fraud accusations.

"What [Trump is] trying to do is set himself up for 2024 but he’s also trying to make everyone think or at least his supporters think that he was the actual winner," Natasha Lindstaedt, a professor at the University of Essex.

"Some think that this is because [Trump is] worried about what’s going to happen to him once he’s no longer president," Lindstaedt added, stating that the US president could be prosecuted when he isn't president any longer.

Lindstaedt explained that a public relying on different news sources has added to polarisation in the country.

Meanwhile preparations for Joe Biden's inauguration are underway, though it's set to be different this year due to the pandemic.

Share this articleComments

You might also like

Donald Trump's options narrow as Michigan pushes on with certifying Biden victory

'More people may die': Joe Biden urges Donald Trump to aid transition

Record number of NATO allies meeting their defence spending target amid war in Ukraine