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Watch back: UK government issues restrictions in Bolton following rise in COVID-19 cases

Britain's Health Secretary Matt Hancock arrives in Downing Street in London, Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2020. Britain's parliament returned Tuesday after the summer break.
Britain's Health Secretary Matt Hancock arrives in Downing Street in London, Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2020. Britain's parliament returned Tuesday after the summer break.   -   Copyright  Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP Photo
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Health minister Matt Hancock told the House of Commons that there would be local restrictions in Greater Manchester amid rising COVID-19 cases.

The UK health minister said the government would restrict pubs and restaurants to takeaway only in Bolton and require venues to close from 10 pm to 5 am.

He said the area had the highest incidence rate in the UK with 120 new cases per 100,000 people.

Speaking before the House of Commons, Hancock said the first defence for combatting COVID-19 is social distancing and afterwards it's testing and tracing.

Hancock said that he wanted the UK to learn a lesson from what happened in Spain, the United States and France and work to control the virus effectively.

Hancock explained that younger people in their 20s and 30s who were socialising were increasingly testing positive and highlighted new research that shows that younger people can became sick with COVID-19 for months.

A coronavirus phone application recording symptoms of 300,000 people showed that at least 60,000 people had symptoms that lasted for more than three months.

Hancock said earlier in the day that the government would create clinics to help people recover from COVID-19, whether they were hospitalised or not for the virus originally.

In one exchange in the Commons, Conservative MP Edward Leigh said that lockdowns do not work and said the government could not enforce social distancing.

Leigh said young people just need to avoid vulnerable people.

Hancock said that "young people can have debilitating long term consequences from this disease" and said that shielding older people is not an effective strategy.

"This disease is absolutely insidious at getting from person to person," Hancock said. He said he wanted to learn the lessons of what happened in other countries.

Hancock said they needed to act before the number of deaths began to rise in the country.

It comes after the UK confirmed nearly 3,000 new cases of COVID-19 on Monday, the highest number since May.

England's deputy chief medical officer Jonathan Van-Tam recently said the rise in cases was a "great concern" stating that people had "relaxed too much".