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EU road trip day 3: from fishmonger to footballer, the view on EU politics from Portugal

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EU road trip day 3: from fishmonger to footballer, the view on EU politics from Portugal
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With the EU Parliamentary elections just ten weeks away, Euronews is counting down by taking a road trip across the continent and talking to voters about what matters to them. The next leg of our journey took us from Setubal to Montemor-O-Novo in Portugal.

Politicians 'aren't working for us' say Portuguese fishmongers

Portugal is one of the countries with the most optimistic view of the EU, with 70 per cent of people believing they are better off in Europe. But on the ground many people have been telling Euronews that they struggle to believe that Brussels keeps them in mind when making decisions. Reporter Anelise Borges went to a local fish market in Setubal to hear local views on European politics.

"Politicians are destroying us," one fishmonger said. "They only create problems for people. They don't help us. Politicians only help big companies where they hold interests. I'm saying this because I'm not a politician and I don't want anything to do with these people."

When asked whether European politics was helpful for Portugal one woman replied: "I have no idea. We don't see it. If something does come I don't know where it goes to. Certainly not to the poor."

"There used to be purchasing power," added another local worker. "Benefits, housing... Things are getting much worse".

Portuguese footballer Nuno Gomes: 'Politics needs to work on its marketing'

While in the area Euronews was joined on the red couch by Portuguese football star Nuno Gomes to talk politics, populism and the future of Europe. He had a few tips for EU politicians:

"I think perhaps if people knew better what politicians do, they might be more understanding towards politicians. Often the general opinion we have about politicians and politics itself is not the reality. So if politicians would talk more about their work, their day-to-day life, as it happens in football, people would see politicians and politics in a different way.

"I believe that. Football has that power, because it is a 'passion' industry, people love football. It's different with politics, not all people like politics. It is rare to find someone who does not like football. Football unites people in the direction of a common passion and politics needs to, perhaps, work on its marketing."