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Hungary takes aim at EU's Jean-Claude Juncker in new campaign poster

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Hungary takes aim at EU's Jean-Claude Juncker in new campaign poster
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The Hungarian government revealed a new poster campaign on Monday evening, which takes aim at European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker and Hungarian-American billionaire George Soros for alleged EU migration proposals.

The poster, which features a picture of both Juncker and Soros, says Hungarians "have the right to know what Brussels is about to do," before making several claims about EU proposals that would "threaten Hungary's security."

"They want to introduce mandatory resettlement quotas. They want to weaken member states' right to border protection. They would ease immigration with migrant visas," the poster claims.

The EU rejected the assertions outright.

“The Hungarian government campaign beggars belief,” Commission spokesman Margaritis Schinas told a press briefing. “It is shocking that such a ludicrous conspiracy theory has reached the mainstream to the extent it has."

He said that EU countries have responsibility for managing their own borders and deciding what level of migration to accept.

While this may be a new campaign, this is not the first time the three have come to blows.

Soros, a supporter of liberal democracy, has long been a political target of Hungary's far-right Prime Minister Viktor Orban and his Fidesz party. Open Society Foundations, a charity founded by Soros, made the decision to close its office in Budapest in 2018 after repeated attacks from Orban, including claims that the charity had encouraged migration to Europe.

Juncker, however, verbally attacked the Hungarian prime minister in December, calling him "the origin of fake news."

“When Mr. Orban for example says ... that migrants are responsible for Brexit, it’s fake news. So let’s not put all the responsibility on others,” Juncker told reporters.

Euronews has reached out to EU officials for comment on Hungary's claims.