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Anti-government protests continue in Serbia for 10th week

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Serbia Protests
Serbia Protests
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Anti-government protesters in their thousands took to the streets of Belgrade on Saturday night for the tenth weekly demonstration of its kind.

The protesters are a mix of citizens movements, opposition parties, from both left and right, academics, students and ordinary people.

They are united in the belief that Serbia with president Aleksandar Vucic at the helm is sliding towards autocratic rule and that the country is gripped by political violence and a climate of fear.

One of the organisers, Jelena Anasonovic, explained why she was there: "We hope that this situation in Serbia, this raising violence as a ruling method of our Serbian Progressive Party will change," she said.

After more than two months of weekly protests people are still coming out in huge numbers and many political analysts believe the protests are beginning to shake the government:

"The regime has become very nervous since the protests began," Political Analyst, Jovo Bakic told euronews.

"The regime is about to understand that it can not do everything that it wants to do and this clear message is the most important legacy of these protests."

When the protests first began they were held only in the Serbian capital.

But in January this year 30 cities across Serbia held similar protests and 20 cities have announced rallies in February.

President Vucic has hinted at calling snap elections to address the concerns of protesters in the ballot box.

That option is not on the table for the opposition. They are demanding that a “transitional government” of experts be put in place to secure conditions for free and fair elections.

Euronews reporter in Belgrade, Jorgen Samso, explains: "President Vucic has said that he is willing to meet with and hear from citizens who are not satisfied with the way he rules Serbia.

"On the other hand he has also said he will a not give in to blackmail from the opposition. So, a political deadlock as protests are continuing and spreading across the country."