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French terror suspect to stand trial for killing 4 at Jewish Museum in Brussels

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French terror suspect to stand trial for killing 4 at Jewish Museum in Brussels

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Frenchman Mehdi Nemmouche was ordered to stand trial for allegedly killing four people at the Jewish Museum in Brussels four years ago in a jihadist attack.

Judges decided there was enough evidence to try Nemmouche and an accomplice in a Belgian court.

The victims were Emmanuel and Myriam RIva, a middle-aged couple on holiday from Tel Aviv, while a French woman named Dominique Sabrier was the third victim.

A young Belgian man who worked at the museum, Alexandre Strens, was critically wounded and eventually died of his wounds days later.

He was born in Morocco to a Jewish mother and Algerian Berber father, and his body was returned to Taza, Morocco, for burial in a Muslim cemetery.

The attack sent shockwaves through Europe. For Jewish communities, it's living with a permanent danger, as Rabbi Avi Tawil, President of the European Jewish Community Centre in Brussels, explains.

"I walk in the street with a kippah, so I can be easily identified as Jewish. So, I must share with you that on many occasions, we are reminded, in the street, of our origins and not in a very pleasant way. What is actually more interesting, is that my children are targeted more often than myself."

After the attack, the Belgian government increased police security in Jewish neighbourhoods and protected synagogues and other places.

The Jewish community in Belgium now numbers about 40,000 people, most of whom reside in Antwerp or Brussels.

Rabbi Avi Tawil: "Where there is a child who is being targeted, if a Muslim child, because there is a lot of anti-Muslim hatred, as we all know, I feel an attack against my children. So I do hope that when a Jewish child is targeted, it is an issue of the entire society, not only of a specific community."