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US honours Pearl Harbor victims - 75 years on

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By Euronews
US honours Pearl Harbor victims - 75 years on

<p>December 7, 1941, was a date that President Franklin Roosevelt said “will live in infamy”.</p> <p>The shock and horror of Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor catapulted the United States into World War Two.</p> <p>This Wednesday. exactly 75 years on, ceremonies at the naval base in Hawaii are honouring the 2,390 American lives lost and the US military veterans who survived.</p> <p>“The fireball got us all,” explained Donald Stratton, 94, who said he was with a group of sailors who had to tie a rope between two ships and make their way across to escape, despite being so badly burned that he no longer has fingerprints.</p> <p>“We got a hold of a sailor on board the vessel and he threw us a heaving line, which is a heavy line with a weight on it. And he tied the heavier line on and we pulled that across and proceeded to go hand over hand across to the vessel, 70 or 80 feet. I don’t know how I made it but I’m here.”</p> <br /> <p><blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="fr"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Seventy-five years ago this week, Japan surprised the world with a sneak attack on Pearl Harbor. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/PearlHarbor75?src=hash">#PearlHarbor75</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/HonorThem?src=hash">#HonorThem</a> <a href="https://t.co/wmYFnpfYK9">pic.twitter.com/wmYFnpfYK9</a></p>— U.S. Dept of Defense (@DeptofDefense) <a href="https://twitter.com/DeptofDefense/status/806468570871758848">7 décembre 2016</a></blockquote> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p> <br /> <p>The 90-minute raid also left 1,178 people wounded, sank or heavily damaged a dozen US warships and destroyed 323 aircraft, badly crippling the Pacific fleet.</p> <p>The United States declared war on Japan the next day.</p> <br /> <p><blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="fr"><p lang="en" dir="ltr"><a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/USNavy?src=hash">#USNavy</a> Sailor on why he planned <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/PearlHarbor75?src=hash">#PearlHarbor75</a> visit for 5 years. He's holding 2010 commemoration document signed by <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/PearlHarbor?src=hash">#PearlHarbor</a> survivors <a href="https://t.co/jmx2718wb9">pic.twitter.com/jmx2718wb9</a></p>— U.S. Navy (@USNavy) <a href="https://twitter.com/USNavy/status/805664534467870720">5 décembre 2016</a></blockquote> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p> <br /> <p>Louis Conter, 95, said he initially helped retrieve bodies and victims from the burning wreckage and then spent days trying to put out the blaze.</p> <p>“We stayed on after and pulled bodies and people off the fire,” he remembered.</p> <p>“After about 40 minutes, we were getting water on the quarterdeck up to our knees,” he said, explaining that somebody then cried ‘abandon ship’.</p> <p>“So we took what bodies we had and what people we had and put them in the motor launches and we got them to the hospital.”</p> <p>Nearly half of those who perished at Pearl Harbor were sailors aboard the battleship <span class="caps">USS</span> Arizona, which Japanese torpedo bombers sank early in the attack, sending 1,177 of its 1,400-member crew to their deaths.</p> <br /> <p><blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="fr"><p lang="en" dir="ltr"><a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/MondayMotivation?src=hash">#MondayMotivation</a>: Aloha from the USS Arizona Memorial at <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/PearlHarbor75?src=hash">#PearlHarbor75</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/HonorThePast?src=hash">#HonorThePast</a> to <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/InspireTheFuture?src=hash">#InspireTheFuture</a> <a href="https://t.co/x3W621e9w0">pic.twitter.com/x3W621e9w0</a></p>— U.S. Navy (@USNavy) <a href="https://twitter.com/USNavy/status/805870415969185794">5 décembre 2016</a></blockquote> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p> <br /> <p>Later this month, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe will become the first Japanese leader to visit Pearl Harbor. He will be joined by Barack Obama – the first serving US president to visit Hiroshima in Japan where the United States dropped an atomic bomb in the closing days of the war.</p> <br /> <p><blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="fr"><p lang="en" dir="ltr"><a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/SecDef?src=hash">#SecDef</a> on progress made with Japan since <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/PearlHarbor?src=hash">#PearlHarbor</a>: out of depths of WWII, our nations have forged a common bond based on shared values <a href="https://t.co/v0Z6O9Edka">pic.twitter.com/v0Z6O9Edka</a></p>— U.S. Dept of Defense (@DeptofDefense) <a href="https://twitter.com/DeptofDefense/status/806311893245853696">7 décembre 2016</a></blockquote> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p>