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Against the odds, Socialist leader attempts to form new Spanish government

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By Seamus Kearney
Against the odds, Socialist leader attempts to form new Spanish government

<p>An attempt is underway in the Spanish parliament to form a new coalition government.</p> <p>Socialist leader Pedro Sanchez is presenting a plan ahead of a confidence vote on Wednesday, but already it seems his bid to become prime minister after inconclusive elections in December is unlikely to succeed.</p> <p>“I ask you for trust to build a government of change,” he told deputies.</p> <p>“I offer myself to lead a government of common good based on two principles: common wellbeing and common sense, because Spain urgently needs a government and a political deal to produce that change.”</p> <p>However, a lack of support from other parties means Sanchez will have an almost impossible job to win the confidence vote.</p> <p>He struck a deal with one new liberal party but another has scoffed at the plan to form a coalition.</p> <p>An abstention by the other main parties is what Sanchez is hoping for, to be able to form a minority government.</p> <p>But already the main conservative Popular Party, which also failed to form a government, says it will vote against the plan. </p> <p>If no agreement is reached new elections will be needed, most likely in June. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Pedro Sánchez’s pretty face — Can the Socialist put an end to Spain’s political impasse? <a href="https://t.co/LFkNv77u4g">https://t.co/LFkNv77u4g</a> <a href="https://t.co/XGKpfrdLtF">pic.twitter.com/XGKpfrdLtF</a></p>— <span class="caps">POLITICO</span> Europe (@POLITICOEurope) <a href="https://twitter.com/POLITICOEurope/status/704559356751290368">March 1, 2016</a></blockquote> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Spanish Socialist supremo Pedro Sanchez in last ditch battle to form government <a href="https://t.co/Hb0D0NJvWU">https://t.co/Hb0D0NJvWU</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Spain?src=hash">#Spain</a> <a href="https://t.co/ykqke8SpZz">pic.twitter.com/ykqke8SpZz</a></p>— Sputnik UK (@SputnikNewsUK) <a href="https://twitter.com/SputnikNewsUK/status/704707282752372737">March 1, 2016</a></blockquote> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Could Sánchez lose the parliament vote this week but still keep his chances alive of becoming Spain's next leader? <a href="https://t.co/gp8dDQ5EOZ">https://t.co/gp8dDQ5EOZ</a></p>— Raphael Minder (@RaphaelMinder) <a href="https://twitter.com/RaphaelMinder/status/704709499752415232">March 1, 2016</a></blockquote> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr"><span class="caps">MADRID</span> (Reuters) – Spain's Socialist leader Pedro Sanchez sought last-minute backing from other parties on… <a href="https://t.co/pmIbfBXhBq">https://t.co/pmIbfBXhBq</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/FB?src=hash">#FB</a></p>— Mexico News Robot (@MexicoNewsBot) <a href="https://twitter.com/MexicoNewsBot/status/704647454034161665">March 1, 2016</a></blockquote> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>