Against the odds, Socialist leader attempts to form new Spanish government

Against the odds, Socialist leader attempts to form new Spanish government
By Seamus Kearney
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Socialist leader Pedro Sanchez is presenting a political plan ahead of a confidence vote on Wednesday

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An attempt is underway in the Spanish parliament to form a new coalition government.

Socialist leader Pedro Sanchez is presenting a plan ahead of a confidence vote on Wednesday, but already it seems his bid to become prime minister after inconclusive elections in December is unlikely to succeed.

“I ask you for trust to build a government of change,” he told deputies.

“I offer myself to lead a government of common good based on two principles: common wellbeing and common sense, because Spain urgently needs a government and a political deal to produce that change.”

However, a lack of support from other parties means Sanchez will have an almost impossible job to win the confidence vote.

He struck a deal with one new liberal party but another has scoffed at the plan to form a coalition.

An abstention by the other main parties is what Sanchez is hoping for, to be able to form a minority government.

But already the main conservative Popular Party, which also failed to form a government, says it will vote against the plan.

If no agreement is reached new elections will be needed, most likely in June.

Pedro Sánchez’s pretty face — Can the Socialist put an end to Spain’s political impasse? https://t.co/LFkNv77u4gpic.twitter.com/XGKpfrdLtF

— POLITICO Europe (@POLITICOEurope) March 1, 2016

Spanish Socialist supremo Pedro Sanchez in last ditch battle to form government https://t.co/Hb0D0NJvWU#Spainpic.twitter.com/ykqke8SpZz

— Sputnik UK (@SputnikNewsUK) March 1, 2016

Could Sánchez lose the parliament vote this week but still keep his chances alive of becoming Spain's next leader? https://t.co/gp8dDQ5EOZ

— Raphael Minder (@RaphaelMinder) March 1, 2016

MADRID (Reuters) – Spain's Socialist leader Pedro Sanchez sought last-minute backing from other parties on… https://t.co/pmIbfBXhBq#FB

— Mexico News Robot (@MexicoNewsBot) March 1, 2016

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