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Would a UN-backed government save Libya's oilfields?

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By Catherine Hardy
Would a UN-backed government save Libya's oilfields?

<p>Oilfields in Libya are likely to come under further attack unless a United Nations-backed government is approved.</p> <p>The comments come from the head of the National Oil Corporation, Mustafa Sanalla.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"align="center"><p lang="en" dir="ltr"><a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LibyaSummit?src=hash">#LibyaSummit</a> kicking off w/ Mustafa Sanalla, Chairman of <span class="caps">NOC</span> Libya giving the opening speech. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/oilandgas?src=hash">#oilandgas</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/london?src=hash">#london</a> <a href="http://t.co/Wci3W1BTWM">pic.twitter.com/Wci3W1BTWM</a></p>— <span class="caps">IRN</span> Oil & Gas (@IRN_OilandGas) <a href="https://twitter.com/IRN_OilandGas/status/656038342765772800">October 19, 2015</a></blockquote> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script> <p>He spoke out after <span class="caps">ISIL</span> militants targeted the Fida oil field last Friday.</p> <h3><strong>The context</strong></h3> <p>Experts say Libya is rapidly turning into a new front in the fight against <span class="caps">ISIL</span>.</p> <p>The organisation is trying to exploit the years of chaos in the country to expand its foothold in the oil-rich, North African nation.</p> <p>Forging a unified government is a monumental task. Libya has effectively been a failed state since the death of Muammar Gadaffi in 2011.</p> <p>Post-Gaddafi, the country was carved up by powerful militias.</p> <p>There are currently two governments. One is based in the capital, Tripoli, is dominated by Islamists and backed by a coalition of militias.</p> <p>The other is internationally-recognised and based in the eastern city of Tobruk.</p> <h3><strong>In numbers</strong></h3> <ul> <li>Total production is 360-370,000 barrels per day</li> </ul> <ul> <li>This is less than 25% of the 1.6 million <span class="caps">BPD</span> Libya was producing before the 2011 uprising</li> </ul> <ul> <li>100,000 <span class="caps">BPD</span> for domestic consumption, the rest exported</li> </ul> <p><em>“If there is no new government, I think the situation will get worse. I believe there will be more attacks on the oil facilities.”</em> – <strong>Mustafa Sanalla</strong></p>