This content is not available in your region

New snowy Cairo picture debunked

Access to the comments Comments
By Euronews
New snowy Cairo picture debunked

<p>After last week’s first snowfall in Cairo in 112 years, several pictures have been circulating on social media of the Egyptian capital or landmarks under a white blanket. However some have been proved to be fake.</p> <p>For instance, the image in the following tweet was debunked by the collaborative efforts of journalists in <a href="https://plus.google.com/118358993174479176125/posts/PPvDhchW5Hr" rel="external">Storyful's Open Newsroom.</a></p> <p><blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="fr"><p>No it is not Switzerland. This is how <a href="https://twitter.com/search?q=%23Sinai&src=hash">#Sinai</a> looked yesterday. مصر بقت أد الدنيا أهو Lollllz <a href="http://t.co/t1HdB9n1js">pic.twitter.com/t1HdB9n1js</a></p>— Jasmine Elnadeem (@Selnadeem) <a href="https://twitter.com/Selnadeem/statuses/411440366790119424">13 Décembre 2013</a></blockquote> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p> <p>Indeed, this picture, as Open Newsroom notes, has been circulating since at least January 8, 2013.</p> <p>Another example is a picture of the Pyramids and the Sphinx under snow, which actually is a shot of a Japanese miniature park’s copy of the monument. </p> <p><blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="fr"><p>This <a href="https://twitter.com/search?q=%23photo&src=hash">#photo</a> of the sphinx covered with snow is from a miniature exhibition in <a href="https://twitter.com/search?q=%23Japan&src=hash">#Japan</a>, not <a href="https://twitter.com/search?q=%23Egypt&src=hash">#Egypt</a> <a href="http://t.co/1cu2HaJbp7">pic.twitter.com/1cu2HaJbp7</a></p>— Egyptian Streets (@EgyptianStreets) <a href="https://twitter.com/EgyptianStreets/statuses/411763617688612864">14 Décembre 2013</a></blockquote><br /> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p> <p>It seems one more picture needs to be added to the list of debunked snowy Cairo images.</p> <p>On December 14, the Twitter account @HistoryInPics posted this:</p> <p><blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="fr"><p>Snow has fallen on the pyramids for the first time in 112 years. <a href="http://t.co/pzXTqdHvGp">pic.twitter.com/pzXTqdHvGp</a></p>— History In Pictures (@HistoryInPics) <a href="https://twitter.com/HistoryInPics/statuses/411982238914314240">14 Décembre 2013</a></blockquote> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p> <p>But social media users were quick to note the similarities between this image and another picture, and called the original poster on it. </p> <p><blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="fr"><p>Oh hey <a href="https://twitter.com/HistoryInPics">@HistoryInPics</a>. Say, isn’t this the same photo, but without the crappy filter? Wow. I think it is… <a href="http://t.co/KdgT09X6Ha">pic.twitter.com/KdgT09X6Ha</a></p>— Mikey Smith (@mikeysmith) <a href="https://twitter.com/mikeysmith/statuses/411987350026076160">14 Décembre 2013</a></blockquote> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p>