BREAKING NEWS
This content is not available in your region

Myanmar: Suu Kyi's trial took place without her lawyer, claim HRW

Access to the comments Comments
euronews_icons_loading
Demonstrators, with eyes blindfolded, lie down in the street to a protest a military coup in Yangon, Myanmar, Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2021.
Demonstrators, with eyes blindfolded, lie down in the street to a protest a military coup in Yangon, Myanmar, Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2021.   -   Copyright  STR/Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.
Text size Aa Aa

The trial of Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi took place in secret on Tuesday without her lawyer present, Human Rights Watch (HRW) has told Euronews.

Suu Kyi was detained after the military staged a coup on February 1, claiming a recent election was rigged.

Court authorities had said Suu Kyi's trial was to take place on Wednesday but instead happened a day earlier, according to HRW.

"The court and the prosecutors are pulling a fast one." Phil Robertson, deputy director of Human Rights Watch Asia told The Cube, Euronews' social media newsdesk.

"They told Aung San Suu Kyi's lawyer that it was going to be on Wednesday. He found out it was happening today, and by the time he got to the court it was already over."

Suu Kyi was first arrested on a charge of illegally possessing walkie-talkies — an apparent attempt to justify her house arrest.

On Monday the military brought about a second charge for breaking coronavirus restrictions, meaning they can now hold her for an indefinite period of time. This second trial will commence on March 1, says HRW.

The coup has sparked widespread protests.

There have also been consecutive nights of internet blackouts, which experts claim is a bid by the military to try and suppress the demonstrations.

Internet connectivity fell to 14% on Sunday night, before being restored on Monday morning. It was then cut again to about 15% for eight hours on Monday evening.

This is the fourth internet blackout the country has experienced since the military-coup overturned the government earlier in the month.

"There has been a growing resistance as well as resentment to the military administration all over the country," Soe Myint Aung, director of the Yangon Centre for Independent Research told The Cube.

"Their [the protesters'] aim is to at least disrupt the system and the government shutdown.

"The international community should be keeping up the pressure on the military administration so that the short term realisable goals can be achieved like the release of Aung San Suu Kyi and other leaders."