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From lullabies to lovesongs: The first ever European Union songbook

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From lullabies to lovesongs: The first ever European Union songbook
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REUTERS / Ronen Zvulun
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Europeans have been given the opportunity to share a piece of their national identity with their European Union brethren with the bloc's first-ever songbook.

From lullabies to love songs, citizens can vote on songs from six categories to represent their country in the book, which is set to be released in December 2019.

"Amar Pelos Dois", written by Luísa Sobral, is the Portuguese choice in the love song category.

Polls in Spain for its contributions opened on February 22, and more than 4,000 Spaniards have already cast their votes.

So far, 138 songs from 23 member states have been selected with more than 53,000 voters taking part.

The final product will contain sheet music for 162 songs and will be available in all 24 official languages of the EU.

Na Kráľovej holi is Slovakia's selection in the freedom and peace song category.

The European Union Song Book project was founded in Denmark in 2015.

The project's Danish chairman and lyrics editor Jeppe Marsling said he was inspired to create the songbook with his neighbour Francesco Cali, an Italian composer, after hearing him play an Italian love song.

"We realised how little we knew about each other's song culture," Marsling said of the experience.

The United Kingdom, which made its selections in 2016, will mostly be excluded from the final print, with the exception of its folk song pick "Auld Lang Syne", written by Scottish poet Robert Burns.

"Auld Lang Syne" will be included as the UK's folk song.

Marsling said they decided to include the song because "it reminds us all that the Brits could come back."

In the 2016 Brexit referendum, 62% of Scots voted to remain in the European Union.

Vote here on your country’s contributions.